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D.Nihal

Repair Tyre Punch

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Hi

I had a tyre punch yesterday on my vehicle, Kyron and it was a small nailed punch.

This was repaired  in a tyre shop on Kandana-Gampahe road, Kandana.

(Between Kandana railway station and Kandana town)

They removed the tyre and applied a circular white colour sticky material and did the repair.

But the cost was amazing, Rs. 1200/- and then came down to Rs. 950/- 

I am of the view that this is an extra ordinary cost.

I seek experts' view on this cost.

Nihal

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This type of patch repair fetch different amounts depending on the tyre shop, vehicle type etc.  :) 

I think i paid 700 for this sort of repair few months back. 

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I keep a puncture repair kit in the car available through local and international web stores.

This is the same kind you get in the wayside tire repair shops.

Comes in handy when you do not have a spare and dependent on the car puncture repair kit with the bottle and the pump.

This is a permanent solution and most of the time can be done on site without even removing the wheel.

 

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I also had a tire puncture about a month ago and repaired it at a shop in Maradana. The guy who did the job said "let's do a double" for the repair. I didn't quite understand what it meant. But the cost was just Rs. 360/-.

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Buy a tubeless tyre puncture repair kit. Available at Sri Lankan online retailers and some supermarkets for about Rs. 500. Look at a YouTube video on how to use it. Try it on an old tyre. Keep the repair kit and a pair of pliers in the car. It is a very reliable fix.

Usually, you don't have to remove the tyre. Jack up and rotate the tyre to see the puncture. Fix it and pump air. Quicker than fixing the spare wheel. Cheaper than the repair cartridge that you have to pump in and drive a certain distance at a certain speed!

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Hi All

Thank you very much for your views.

Based on these, briefly the cost depends upon the shop and the vehicle.

But my view is that it has to be dependent only on the extent of the damage and they have three types.

But it should not depend on the vehicle as they use the same material to all vehicle based on the extent of the damage.

Other important issue is, after patching up this way, hole crated does not fill up and bond, but in old method, it does.

So old patching up, in my opinion, is much better.

So are we paying not just twice, but more than five times for a poor bonded patching up!?

Regards

Nihal

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18 hours ago, varotone said:

Buy a tubeless tyre puncture repair kit. Available at Sri Lankan online retailers and some supermarkets for about Rs. 500. Look at a YouTube video on how to use it. Try it on an old tyre. Keep the repair kit and a pair of pliers in the car. It is a very reliable fix.

Usually, you don't have to remove the tyre. Jack up and rotate the tyre to see the puncture. Fix it and pump air. Quicker than fixing the spare wheel. Cheaper than the repair cartridge that you have to pump in and drive a certain distance at a certain speed!

Most of the time you don't even have to jack it up if the nail is in the outer side of the Tyre

Locate the nail by moving the vehicle slowly if you have assistance of someone this will be easy. Remove the nail and plug in.

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4 hours ago, D.Nihal said:

ut it should not depend on the vehicle as they use the same material to all vehicle based on the extent of the damage.

What i meant was, the vehicle you drive may influence the price :) 

As they dont have he prices for patch jobs displaying they may charge one price for a Maruti and another for a Merc 

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5 hours ago, D.Nihal said:

So old patching up, in my opinion, is much better.

Many say that when you repair a puncture by plugging, there is more damage done than the puncture itself. When using the rasp to smooth out, it makes the hole bigger, damages the steel belts and finally when it is plugged it distorts the structure of the tire.  Maybe the old method of removing the tire from the rim and fixing from the inside is better. But the new method is very easy, quick and maintains the tire pressure. Anyway, tires being consumables, why worry too much about how the puncture is repaired if it gets the job done? 

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On 10/1/2019 at 2:24 PM, varotone said:

Many say that when you repair a puncture by plugging, there is more damage done than the puncture itself. When using the rasp to smooth out, it makes the hole bigger, damages the steel belts and finally when it is plugged it distorts the structure of the tire.  Maybe the old method of removing the tire from the rim and fixing from the inside is better. But the new method is very easy, quick and maintains the tire pressure. Anyway, tires being consumables, why worry too much about how the puncture is repaired if it gets the job done? 

Besides they are made to wear off and replace, plugging has kinda worked for ages now isn’t it

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