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vitz

Eclipse Cross

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Bit of Research about the type of fuel needed for the Eclipse Cross revealed that the Octane 92 is fine with the vehicle. (JDM recommendation is : Regular gasoline) Though, I used Octane 95 to date, I would not continue so as it a waste of money......

 

image.png.51cf31a678f835f8f5b39ce04e8df277.png

 

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Hellow Mistsubishi Experts

I need to top up the coolant of my EC. It has come with a gree color coolant. What is the coolant brand I should use (of course i do the service by myself)..... 

Edited by vitz

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On 3/17/2019 at 9:01 PM, vitz said:

Bit of Research about the type of fuel needed for the Eclipse Cross revealed that the Octane 92 is fine with the vehicle. (JDM recommendation is : Regular gasoline) Though, I used Octane 95 to date, I would not continue so as it a waste of money......

 

image.png.51cf31a678f835f8f5b39ce04e8df277.png

 

Now I confirm that EC can run with Octane 92. I have already done 8000 km using OCT92 without any issue :) 

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38 minutes ago, vitz said:

 

I need to top up the coolant of my EC. It has come with a gree color coolant. What is the coolant brand I should use (of course i do the service by myself)..... 

You can use distilled water upto 1l (for 20k+ kms my Lancer still havent lost 500ml) mine has a 6l coolant capacity, the coolant concentration recommended by Mitsubishi is 30%-60% according to the workshop manual, so adjust accordingly to your coolant capacity.

You could buy OEM coolant from UNIMO too

Edited by Hyaenidae

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1 hour ago, Hyaenidae said:

You can use distilled water upto 1l

Make sure you use distilled water rather than deionised water which we find commonly as battery water.

Edited by CNX

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59 minutes ago, CNX said:

Make sure you use distilled water rather than deionised water which we find commonly as battery water.

What is the difference between those two? How does it affect the cooling system?

Almost all battery water bottles sold in SL say "distilled water" on the label though

Edited by Hyaenidae

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22 hours ago, Hyaenidae said:

You can use distilled water upto 1l (for 20k+ kms my Lancer still havent lost 500ml) mine has a 6l coolant capacity, the coolant concentration recommended by Mitsubishi is 30%-60% according to the workshop manual, so adjust accordingly to your coolant capacity.

You could buy OEM coolant from UNIMO too

Many Thanks. The coolant level is almost at the "Min" after running 10,000 km. It looks that it is a bit coolant loss in turbo units. Same we experience in our CHR too.....

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20 hours ago, Hyaenidae said:

What is the difference between those two? How does it affect the cooling system?

Almost all battery water bottles sold in SL say "distilled water" on the label though

Yeah. De-ionized water would be much better. When de-ionized water is made, all salt ions dissolved in water are removed through an ion exchanger. Thus, free of some dissolved salt ions. But, distilled water retains some salt ions after the distillation process. The use of RO water could also be an option, but keeping in mind that drinking RO water plants add some essential minerals after the RO process. If you could find laboratory RO water, a good replacement for de-ionized water. 

The problem is unless someone has contacts with a lab (I am privileged :)) it would be difficult to find out de-ionized water. 

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8 minutes ago, vitz said:

Yeah. De-ionized water would be much better. When de-ionized water is made, all salt ions dissolved in water are removed through an ion exchanger. Thus, free of some dissolved salt ions. But, distilled water retains some salt ions after the distillation process.

How come salt (NaCl) is an ion though?

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17 minutes ago, vitz said:

Many Thanks. The coolant level is almost at the "Min" after running 10,000 km. It looks that it is a bit coolant loss in turbo units. Same we experience in our CHR too.....

Yeah maybe that's the case

I would've bought a premixed coolant had there been 1l containers of Mitsubishi super long life coolant which is recommended for the Lancer, but the agent only carry 4L cans of the stuff. Couldn't find an equivalent coolant either (the workshop manual of the Lancer calls for " high quality ethylene glycol based non-silicate, non-amine, non-nitrate and non-borate coolant with long life hybrid organic acid technology" - the only equivalent I could find was Valvoline zerex asian vehicle coolant which doesnt come in 1l containers either so in the end I resolved to use distilled water rather than using a wrong coolant.

If you're going through the coolant route make sure to find the manufacturers recommendations for the EC. Mitsu super long life coolant is blue so the green coolant used in your EC might be different

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50 minutes ago, Hyaenidae said:

How come salt (NaCl) is an ion though?

By Salts I referred all types of salts such as NaCl, MgCl etc.....distilled water rarely can retain some salts. But surely it will contain sugar, most other organics. Distilled water with a proper filtering system removes all. But, best to use either de-ionized or the pre-mix as Hyaenidae said....

Edited by vitz

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35 minutes ago, Hyaenidae said:

Yeah maybe that's the case

I would've bought a premixed coolant had there been 1l containers of Mitsubishi super long life coolant which is recommended for the Lancer, but the agent only carry 4L cans of the stuff. Couldn't find an equivalent coolant either (the workshop manual of the Lancer calls for " high quality ethylene glycol based non-silicate, non-amine, non-nitrate and non-borate coolant with long life hybrid organic acid technology" - the only equivalent I could find was Valvoline zerex asian vehicle coolant which doesnt come in 1l containers either so in the end I resolved to use distilled water rather than using a wrong coolant.

If you're going through the coolant route make sure to find the manufacturers recommendations for the EC. Mitsu super long life coolant is blue so the green coolant used in your EC might be different

EC comes with "MITSUBISHI MOTORS GENUINE SUPER LONG LIFE COOLANT PREMIUM ". (I will check out the color again:))

Mit recommends "similar high quality ethylene glycol based non-silicate, non-amine, non-nitrate and non-borate coolant with long life hybrid organic acid technology"

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16 minutes ago, vitz said:

EC comes with "MITSUBISHI MOTORS GENUINE SUPER LONG LIFE COOLANT PREMIUM ". (I will check out the color again:))

 

But its blue ne (picture courtesy: @Sampath Gunasekera)

7.jpg.cebe0d9c79c85040fe767b5c404e3ef0.j

Edited by Hyaenidae
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19 minutes ago, vitz said:

By Salts I referred all types of salts such as NaCl, MgCl etc.....distilled water rarely can retain some salts. But surely it will contain sugar, most other organics. Distilled water with a proper filtering system removes all. But, best to use either de-ionized or the pre-mix as Hyaenidae said....

Well the logic of using de-ionized water in cooling systems is its reduced conductivity neh?

I have a brake fluid tester which tests the conductivity of fluids - (it tests the water content of brake fluid by measuring the conductivity of the brake fluid). Tap water makes the tester light up as a christmas tree while the distilled water I use reads as having 0 conductivity so I'm guessing using it won't hurt the cooling system as long as the correct coolant concentration is maintained :)

Edited by Hyaenidae

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On 3/17/2019 at 9:01 PM, vitz said:

Bit of Research about the type of fuel needed for the Eclipse Cross revealed that the Octane 92 is fine with the vehicle. (JDM recommendation is : Regular gasoline) Though, I used Octane 95 to date, I would not continue so as it a waste of money......

 

image.png.51cf31a678f835f8f5b39ce04e8df277.png

 

Hmmm does it give a RON figure?

 

@iRage correct me if i'm wrong but isn't "super" or "premium" in Japan 100 RON with their "regular" sitting not too far below that but above our local base regular 92?

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4 hours ago, Devinda_Z said:

Hmmm does it give a RON figure?

 

@iRage correct me if i'm wrong but isn't "super" or "premium" in Japan 100 RON with their "regular" sitting not too far below that but above our local base regular 92?

Figuring out octanes in Japan is a pain in the ***.

It used to be that regular ranged from 90 - 95 and High Oct 95 - 98 and then High Oct+ (and other funky names) which were 98+ (and not very common).

Depending on the brand regular could have been anything from 90-95 (and similarly somewhere within the range for other categories as well). Now Regular is more commonly closer to 95 unless it is a budget brand. Same with High Oct..now a days its more common to find 98-99ish as HighOct. 

So when a manufacturer in Japan says REGULAR for Japan...the assumption is that it can run on a range between 90-95. 

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On 1/11/2020 at 8:29 AM, Hyaenidae said:

Well the logic of using de-ionized water in cooling systems is its reduced conductivity neh?

I have a brake fluid tester which tests the conductivity of fluids - (it tests the water content of brake fluid by measuring the conductivity of the brake fluid). Tap water makes the tester light up as a christmas tree while the distilled water I use reads as having 0 conductivity so I'm guessing using it won't hurt the cooling system as long as the correct coolant concentration is maintained :)

Yep, the presence of soluble salts should be reflected by the conductivity value....

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Hi,

UM uses the Valvoline SYNPOWER 0W20 Synthetic Motor Oil for EC. However, its quite difficult to find this oil in the market. Is it okay to change from SYNPOWER to Toyota 0W20 fully synthetic (available freely). Digging the literature indicated that we have to be extra cautious when changing to Toyota oils as some additives in toyota oils (sludge formation preventive) could react with chemicals of other oils....This could be a myth though :)

Are there any problems/issues if we use VIC oil filter instead of the Genuine filter 

 

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Servicing the EC: The DIY job

I thought of sharing my experiences of DIY job of servicing the 2018 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross

Changing oil

Tools you need to do this Job

1.       17 mm socket : To remove the oil draining nut

2.       Oil filter removal tool : 68 mm 14 flute (Cap type)Ratchet

3.       10 mm socket: To remove engine cover : Bottom

4.       Ratchet

5.       Torque wrench: Handy to have it

6.       Hydraulic Jack

7.       A set of Vehicle stands

Make sure to run the vehicle for at least 5 minutes before servicing

Jack up the vehicle:

Hint: Be mindful about the Jack up position

image.png.6a1abcab41c4b0b3f0ac4d21c01d3728.png

Support the Jacked up vehicle using two vehicle stands: Safety first

image.png.ffde9fa32d2f7c836ca1a959f644a3db.png

Remove the bottom cover of the engine: There are 4 screws (10 mm) and 4 plastic fasteners need  to be removed. I hate removing plastic fasteners. Anyways, if you get it done in a service station there is a quite a chance to loose these nuts or break

image.png.3812e7c2822043d79ede85e6348be571.png

Unscrew the oil filler cap

image.png.b0187dab4b51183dd034b1a34e1b8d78.png

Unscrew the oil draining nut: 17 mm. Make sure to keep a container on the ground to collect waste oil.

image.png.f0479f70b5a49fab4e97012315dd00c1.png

image.png.21ffc17e4692d60319b9f916a6fc00e8.png

image.png.507ad54520f7ae5191595f26d1e39613.png

Once oil is drained: unscrew the filter using the filter remover tool.

image.png.af95e485b929a18e71d355109e7d0219.png

image.png.cdc320d20133d5dd15bfc55a396d3234.png

After all old oil is drained screw (install) the new filter

You have two choices of filters, either go for the Genuine Filter made by Tokyo Roki (Mitsubishi Part number MD360935) or VIC C-415 Filter. The same filter is used for Mazda too. However, I am really skeptic about the VIC filters as I bought a VIC filter for my EC some time ago (around 3 months). When I checked that before installing I noticed that the filter body is corroded (see the figure below). Without taking a risk for a narrow margin I thought of going for the Genuine Filter (VIC : around Rs. 1000, Genuine for UM: Rs. 2,200.00)

image.png.6309dde5d8f6e5d271515bb780d22bb4.png

Before installing the filter, apply a layer of engine oil on to the rubber gasket of the filter also clean the surfaces filter mount.

image.png.e0e97643db87df3021a6147d6ba0d71b.png

image.png.40188d9240156388c72a7f02f9aa3889.png

When tightening the oil filter, make sure not to over tighten it. What I usually do is tighten using the hand until the gasket (rubber seal) get contacted well. Put a mark on the filter using tip-ex. Tighten ¾ round ( or one round ), such a way that the white-dot made by tip-ex, travels ¾ round (or one round).

image.png.18cb1740d47cece90f4868e18f93d22b.png

Tighten back the oil draining nut. It is recommended to use a new washer with when re-using the nut, however I could not find it in the market L.

image.png.a1d446cbefbbd7cd63335824c1e8f888.png

Tighten the nut for around 39 Nm (anyways, do not over-tighten if you do not have a torque wrench). I am using my torque wrench adapter for that !!!

image.png.07a393a5c74b5724cf162d6ea00ea5d5.png

Now we are set to refill the oil. I use Valvoline Full Synthetic OW-20 (Rs. 6400)

image.png.80049f8c42fa34e17eae05fd175e84a5.png

Pour oil in: Using a funnel to ensure you don't spill oil on the engine hood. If you do spill any oil, be sure to clean it up with a cloth or paper towel.

Pour around 3.5 L and check out the dip-stick oil level (I must say, its really difficult to see the oil level using the Mitsu dipstick especially with new oil)

If the oil level is in-between min-max, crank the engine and run for couple of minutes.

After that, re-check the oil level in the dip-stick and Keep adding small amounts of oil and re-checking with the dipstick until the oil level is between the markers. Once you're happy, close the oil filter cap.

check the oil draining nut and the oil filter for any leaks.

Fix the engine bottom cover, and close the hood.

Better check the oil level in the very next day!!!!!

 

Cleaning the air filter

Remove the air-filter and clean any dirt using the vacuum cleaner. Make sure to pass (suck air) from air input side of the filter (bottom). If the air filter is too dirty, replace with the new one (Around Rs. 7000.00, the Genuine one)

image.png.18eff58b961b49dd29e211719df41371.png

image.png.86f4fe4cd2b66c6b77c75b64450dda47.png

image.png.e0cbf6c519630a925618d7b2c36c0430.png

Check the level of coolant.

Check the level of coolant (mine, coolant level dropped to min after running 10,000 km), top-up coolant to max level using Mistsubishi Super Long Life Coolant (premium), around Rs. 3000 for 4 liters)

image.png.cb34f0c7971a05cc6ee9274d29849ab1.png

Other things…….

Clean/replace the cabin filter

Check the conductivity of brake fluid using a brake fluid tester ( you can import one from Ebay)

Using a good flashlight, check for any leaks, damages to boots, loosening of nuts.

Check the air pressure of 4 tires

Rotate tires once in 8000 – 10000 km. I do it by myself, hydraulic Jack and two-vehicle supports are sufficient to do this job. Tighten lug-nuts to 98 Nm.

Check the level of Battery water: Though its very difficult to do this J due to the placement of the battery in a very difficult to reach the place.

 

 Enjoy the EC for another 5000 km J (of course, make regular check-ups of oil level, coolant level)

 

Edited by vitz
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1 hour ago, vitz said:

Servicing the EC: The DIY job

 

Now THIS is an oil change! Had it been a service station you'd never see the mechanic using a torque wrench on the oil pan plug 👍 were you doing the service on your own since 2018 or is this the first time you diy'ed the oil change?

About the oil dipstick being unclear: you could refer to the owners manual and find the oil capacity of the vehicle. Mine calls for 4L fo the pan + 0.2L for the filter, I get the UNIMO guys to dump a 4L can and its perfectly level or slightly below the 2nd hole on the dipstick. Or you can dump the waste oil into old 4L cans to find out the exact amount of drained oil.

About the viscosity, since yours being a turbo and considering the driving conditions of SL won't it be better if you used something like 5W-30? Check owners manuals for Australian or Russian markets, I've a hunch that a thicker oil might have been recommended for those markets.

The oil pan plug gasket is available at UNIMO workshops, costs Rs. 99.13/-! 😄

 

Edited by Hyaenidae

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57 minutes ago, Hyaenidae said:

Now THIS is an oil change! Had it been for a service station you'd never see the mechanic using a torque wrench on the oil pan plug 👍 were you doing the service on your own since 2018 or is this the first time you diy'ed the oil change?

About the oil dipstick being unclear: you could refer to the owners manual and find the oil capacity of the vehicle. Mine calls for 4L fo the pan + 0.2L for the filter, I get the UNIMO guys to dump a 4L can and its perfectly level or slightly below the 2nd hole on the dipstick. Or you can dump the waste oil into old 4L cans to find out the exact amount of drained oil.

About the viscosity, since yours being a turbo and considering the driving conditions of SL won't it be better if you used something like 5W-30? Check owners manuals for Australian or Russian markets, I've a hunch that a thicker oil might have been recommended for those markets.

The oil pan plug gasket is available at UNIMO workshops, costs Rs. 99.13/-! 😄

 

Hi,

This is the second time I DIY ed the oil change for the EC. The first one (@1000 km) was got done by UM. Indeed, the service station guys donot use the torque wrench. I have been doing the DIY for all vehicles I had for 3- 4 years now!!! I enjoy doing it. Today, I did the service of C-HR of my better half too....:)

The total oil volume mentioned in the Service Manual is 4.3 L. I had little oil left in the can. Thinking of refilling after re-check the oil level in a couple of days.

The Japanese manual recommends either 0w20 or 5W30. They have specifically recommended 0W20 for fuel-efficiency. I thought that better to use a thin oil since the car came with auto start and stop function. UM also uses 0W20. I could not find a user manual for an Australian/Russian market EC. But, US/Canada too the recommendation is 0W20.

Glad to hear that oil pan plug gasket is available at UM workshops. Hopeful it is available in their sparepart outlets as well :). Many thanks for the infor. 

 

Edited by vitz

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10 minutes ago, vitz said:

I could not find a user manual for an Australian/Russian market EC.

 

mmc-manuals.ru is where you'll find the russian manual

Apparently the EC can take upto 20W50 oil

djiHUFD.jpg

 

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3 minutes ago, Hyaenidae said:

mmc-manuals.ru is where you'll find the russian manual

Apparently the EC can take upto 20W50 oil

djiHUFD.jpg

 

I can't understand the reasons for such variation of oil specifications across countries. I understood that I am really ignorant on oil specifications.

This diagram shows that the slot that for local temperature matches,  20W40 or 20W50 suits!!!  Hardly, we use 20W40 for a new vehicle ne?

would 0W20 be too thin under our conditions?

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11 minutes ago, vitz said:

I can't understand the reasons for such variation of oil specifications across countries. I understood that I am really ignorant on oil specifications.

This diagram shows that the slot that for local temperature matches,  20W40 or 20W50 suits!!!  Hardly, we use 20W40 for a new vehicle ne?

would 0W20 be too thin under our conditions?

There's no need to match the local temp range I think, something in the middle like 5W30 would provide better protection under harsh conditions of SL roads IMO

I remember @iRage  offering an explanation about this:

cp5NG2T.jpg

So, since thermal absorption is a higher priority than extremely cold (like 0 deg celcius or less ambient temp) start flow rate for us Sri Lankans I guess an oil like 5W30 would be a better choice, especially since turbocharged engines run hotter than NA ones. Even the turbo version of the WagonR recommends 5W30.

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