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Amilapk

"Honda Civic 2017 (Gen X) 1.5L Turbo"

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On 5/30/2018 at 1:46 PM, Hyaenidae said:

Is it possible to wax the car if you get the car coated with ceramic clearcoat? 

I know they say it's unnecessary, I'm just curious. 

You have to remove wax to apply the ceramic coat. No need to wax the car thereafter. Alternative option is applying silicon dioxide spray once in every 3 months as reload.

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Posted (edited)

Update on the 1st service

As I suspected it was a detailed checkup plus a full service without the change of oil. Took about good 4 hours on a Saturday at Rattanapitiya. 

Running Maps on Original System 

I noticed many people with FK1s are asking on activating Gramin maps of SL. In my case the car came with the default maps disabled from setting. But you can enable it easily. But you do not want to do that. I am using Android Auto to run Google maps on the car system. The Android Auto is not offered for SL in Play Store but I used a apk file to download and install Android Auto into my phone. (I will past the link I used below).

https://www.apkmirror.com/apk/google-inc/android-auto/android-auto-3-2-5815-release/android-auto-maps-media-messaging-voice-3-2-581534-release-android-apk-download/download/

Then the phone need to be connected to the USB port under the dashboard for Android Auto to run its full functionality, otherwise if only Bluetooth is used, it will have limited functions (I have only used Bluetooth for calling only). Google maps can be easily run with this set up. I will upload few photos in my car.

Converting Halogen Fog Lamps to LED

Stock fogs in mine are halogen and I am thinking of changing them to LED to match the headlights. Please advice me on where I can get the matching LEDs with conversion kits (if needed) in SL. Thanks

Edited by Harry (aq)

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13 hours ago, Harry (aq) said:

Converting Halogen Fog Lamps to LED

Stock fogs in mine are halogen and I am thinking of changing them to LED to match the headlights. Please advice me on where I can get the matching LEDs with conversion kits (if needed) in SL. Thanks

If you're really keen on this, don't buy the rubbish available locally. Get yours from PowerBulbs online as they have better kits. I used these conversion kits in the past with my Axio (I now drive a Civic 2018 with stock LED's) and the light wouldn't focus properly. The light throw was too short and despite being able to see the surrounding areas clearer, driving in the rain and on long roads is a nightmare. Also, it annoyed many oncoming drivers and I was flashed several times. Then again, that was a reflector housing and yours is a projector lens so maybe it will work better, however I have seen many videos online complaining of this same problem even with projectors. My suggestion is to maybe go for a whiter halogen bulb like the Philips XtremeVision (has the same stock Wattage, so it won't require re-wiring), which is way whiter than the stock - I used these on my Axio and it was a significant difference with better and further visibility.

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1 hour ago, misnad said:

If you're really keen on this, don't buy the rubbish available locally. Get yours from PowerBulbs online as they have better kits. I used these conversion kits in the past with my Axio (I now drive a Civic 2018 with stock LED's) and the light wouldn't focus properly. The light throw was too short and despite being able to see the surrounding areas clearer, driving in the rain and on long roads is a nightmare. Also, it annoyed many oncoming drivers and I was flashed several times. Then again, that was a reflector housing and yours is a projector lens so maybe it will work better, however I have seen many videos online complaining of this same problem even with projectors. My suggestion is to maybe go for a whiter halogen bulb like the Philips XtremeVision (has the same stock Wattage, so it won't require re-wiring), which is way whiter than the stock - I used these on my Axio and it was a significant difference with better and further visibility.

Mizyyyyy....!!! Good to see you on this forum..!!

Yes, In few posts we discussed about Headlight upgrades. In short it was a pain aligning HID kits, then noticed fading on reflector (I guess due to access heat). Also had a tough time upgrading to 100w halogens. Had to change from wiring to a new alternator.  I think its a better choice running with stock. I could not find a proper video to make my decision to buy Philips XtremeVision. Does not seem to have much difference.  

 

KMeeg (Kasun)

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8 hours ago, misnad said:

My suggestion is to maybe go for a whiter halogen bulb like the Philips XtremeVision (has the same stock Wattage, so it won't require re-wiring), which is way whiter than the stock - I used these on my Axio and it was a significant difference with better and further visibility.

 

6 hours ago, kmeeg said:

I think its a better choice running with stock. I could not find a proper video to make my decision to buy Philips XtremeVision. Does not seem to have much difference.  

Thanks Guys, I totally forgot about this option. If I am not mistaken, there is a white light option in Osram as well. 

Anywhere you guys suggest to buy the white halogens in SL? I know people who have brought them down on ebay. Not sure of the quality though.

 

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On 6/14/2018 at 9:01 AM, Harry (aq) said:

 

Thanks Guys, I totally forgot about this option. If I am not mistaken, there is a white light option in Osram as well. 

Anywhere you guys suggest to buy the white halogens in SL? I know people who have brought them down on ebay. Not sure of the quality though.

 

If I’m not mistaken, you can get the Osrams at the agents for Mercedes here in SL. They have a Lighting Division. However, I prefer the durability of the Philips XtremeVision kits. Got mine from PowerBulbs online. You won’t regret it.

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On 1/20/2018 at 8:48 PM, Clark'sson said:

I could go on and on about the new civic
To make things short
Dont be fooled its considered a hatchbach athough it has a slightly pointy tail
Its not cheap its a 1liter and there are many audis and other european cars too at its price point of close to 7million.
Its not exactly well built altough the things upfront are of quality it seems that they have the hidden bits a lot less attended
Not perticularly loaded for that price point without autobreak hill keep assist and auto parking
NOT made in japan its made in england the land where the parts fall apart probably not the best for the hot climate in sri lanka.
It may be smooth for a 1L 3pot but not as smooth as a 4pot
And its highly doubtful how this big bodied 1L will fare in long term
Its not a disposable item in sri lanka.

After all honda civic sedans were going for the 4mill range few years ago so what happened.
Still i think the FD1 was much better specialy with a 1.8 and it was a proper sedan

If i had that amount of money to dump on a car Id try to go for a audi a3 or q2 (may be slightly higher priced) a CHR
If its not essential to be brand new audi a4 and a lot comes to mind.

Its impulsive to buy because its 1L so it was so called reduced by the budget but if the same car was the same price from the begining would you buy it.
And its a new car so when more used cars come to the market from england the price will reduce.
 

I also have a doubt regarding the 1L turbo engine. Considering the stresses involved, it might not last 100,000 kms. 

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On 7/3/2018 at 3:16 AM, BuBi said:

I also have a doubt regarding the 1L turbo engine. Considering the stresses involved, it might not last 100,000 kms. 

My opinion is that should last for 100,000 kms unless someone drive like a maniac all the time. I don't think Honda would build that level of unreliable engine and have a black mark on their reputation. And its not only the engine that contribute to reliability right? Transmission also play a major role right?

I'm no expert, but I believe no one buys a turbo engine / supercharge engine / high compression engine (like Skyactive) / Hybrid / CVT transmission vehicle for long term reliability. 

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On 7/3/2018 at 4:16 PM, BuBi said:

I also have a doubt regarding the 1L turbo engine. Considering the stresses involved, it might not last 100,000 kms. 

This is exactly what people said about the Turbo charged Subies when they first started coming out...and decades on they still keep on running...True, certain components may have a shorter service cycle but taken care of properly they will last. Like some of you have mentioned...Honda is not going to release an engine that won't last 100,000km. Most Japanese manufacturers took so long to come out with Turbo charged downsized engines because of the long R&D and testing and re-testing.

Are we going to see a lot of worn out Turbo Civics ? Yes...but that has more to do with owner demographic stats rather than the fault of the tech itself. We had a period where all the "thel higanna"/"labha athata wasi" car buyers who bought ship loads of Corollas/Allions/Vezels/Premios/Priuses who were too cheap to run it properly and as a result have a lot of shady units of these models in the country (lets face it...Toyota is not going to build an engine for nearly a decade that is going to seize with sludged engine oil). Now these people have moved on to Civics...so ...in time there will be a lot of shady Civics (put a few Audi models on to this list as well). 

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2 hours ago, iRage said:

This is exactly what people said about the Turbo charged Subies when they first started coming out...and decades on they still keep on running...True, certain components may have a shorter service cycle but taken care of properly they will last. Like some of you have mentioned...Honda is not going to release an engine that won't last 100,000km. Most Japanese manufacturers took so long to come out with Turbo charged downsized engines because of the long R&D and testing and re-testing.

Are we going to see a lot of worn out Turbo Civics ? Yes...but that has more to do with owner demographic stats rather than the fault of the tech itself. We had a period where all the "thel higanna"/"labha athata wasi" car buyers who bought ship loads of Corollas/Allions/Vezels/Premios/Priuses who were too cheap to run it properly and as a result have a lot of shady units of these models in the country (lets face it...Toyota is not going to build an engine for nearly a decade that is going to seize with sludged engine oil). Now these people have moved on to Civics...so ...in time there will be a lot of shady Civics (put a few Audi models on to this list as well). 

Well said!

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4 hours ago, iRage said:

Tso ...in time there will be a lot of shady Civics (put a few Audi models on to this list as well). 

Unfortunately for Audi's it is hard to find a proper guy to service. 

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2 hours ago, Quiet said:

Unfortunately for Audi's it is hard to find a proper guy to service. 

and the few that are there would cost more than your road-side baas...and most of the people are buying these Audis because they are cheap and has badge value....not because they care about the car's characteristics. In time there will be some bad mouthing of the brand as well by these people saying the brand sucks because parts are expensive, etc...

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3 minutes ago, iRage said:

and the few that are there would cost more than your road-side baas...

 

They would cost more than the authorized agents of the Japanese brands ?

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Well I did the first service for my Audi @ 2000KM from Bosch, Cost 25K with oil change etc etc. i thought it was reasonable. Although recommended service interval is 10000Km, they recommended change in 7,500Km. Checked with Vishwa motors, who recommended same interval. 

So far the driving experience is far better than my Mazda 6

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16 minutes ago, Quiet said:

Well I did the first service for my Audi @ 2000KM from Bosch, Cost 25K with oil change etc etc.

2

How much did it cost for a lube change (5k kms service) of the M6 at the agent? :)

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400

41 minutes ago, Hyaenidae said:

How much did it cost for a lube change (5k kms service) of the M6 at the agent? :)

4000 bucks in 5000Km and 14,000 every 10,000Km. so only a slight difference.

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17 hours ago, kmeeg said:

My opinion is that should last for 100,000 kms unless someone drive like a maniac all the time. I don't think Honda would build that level of unreliable engine and have a black mark on their reputation. And its not only the engine that contribute to reliability right? Transmission also play a major role right?

I'm no expert, but I believe no one buys a turbo engine / supercharge engine / high compression engine (like Skyactive) / Hybrid / CVT transmission vehicle for long term reliability. 

Do not get this engine confused with regular naturally aspirated engines machan. There are strong stresses affecting a turbo charged engine. You will not find the longevity of a normal engine from a turbo assisted engine. It is a physical certain. 

Manufacturers' do not care either. They are planning the obsolescence now. They don't want people to use their vehicles more than 10 years. It hurts countries like us of course. But, what can we do? 

P.S - Engine is the main component of a vehicle's reliability. Other parts contributes also but without the engine, nothing would matter. 

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8 hours ago, iRage said:

This is exactly what people said about the Turbo charged Subies when they first started coming out...and decades on they still keep on running...True, certain components may have a shorter service cycle but taken care of properly they will last. Like some of you have mentioned...Honda is not going to release an engine that won't last 100,000km. Most Japanese manufacturers took so long to come out with Turbo charged downsized engines because of the long R&D and testing and re-testing.

Are we going to see a lot of worn out Turbo Civics ? Yes...but that has more to do with owner demographic stats rather than the fault of the tech itself. We had a period where all the "thel higanna"/"labha athata wasi" car buyers who bought ship loads of Corollas/Allions/Vezels/Premios/Priuses who were too cheap to run it properly and as a result have a lot of shady units of these models in the country (lets face it...Toyota is not going to build an engine for nearly a decade that is going to seize with sludged engine oil). Now these people have moved on to Civics...so ...in time there will be a lot of shady Civics (put a few Audi models on to this list as well). 

The time has changed machan. Not too long ago engine manufacturers didn't know how to produce a compact engine with sufficient power to efficiency ratio. Therefore, they had to produce strong engines get larger number of horse power. But now technologies have improved and they know how to get large number of horses out of a relatively compact engine with great fuel efficiency. Though it is a catchy marketing slogan there are hidden gremlins associated with those engines. Longevity is one thing that must be sacrificed.

As I said earlier Vehicle manufacturers do not care whether their product would last more than 10 years. They have sacrificed a lot to achieve the impossible feats like strict emission standards, safety and fuel efficiency all in one go. We have to realize the fact that we do not live in the 90s. 

In conclusion, human factor is an important aspect of deciding the reliability of a vehicle but the vehicle design process is a much more important factor to consider as well. We must not forget that.

 

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, BuBi said:

The time has changed machan. Not too long ago engine manufacturers didn't know how to produce a compact engine with sufficient power to efficiency ratio. Therefore, they had to produce strong engines get larger number of horse power. But now technologies have improved and they know how to get large number of horses out of a relatively compact engine with great fuel efficiency. Though it is a catchy marketing slogan there are hidden gremlins associated with those engines. Longevity is one thing that must be sacrificed.

As I said earlier Vehicle manufacturers do not care whether their product would last more than 10 years. They have sacrificed a lot to achieve the impossible feats like strict emission standards, safety and fuel efficiency all in one go. We have to realize the fact that we do not live in the 90s. 

In conclusion, human factor is an important aspect of deciding the reliability of a vehicle but the vehicle design process is a much more important factor to consider as well. We must not forget that.

 

Again...you are over simplifying things in many ways. Your statement touches base on the simple fact that there are plenty of people who are stuck in the 80s and 90s and not willing to change their behavior and instead blame and shame the technology.

Yes...cars and production methodologies and everything has changed...Yes..cars are built in a manner that they can be easily recyclable, lighter using lighter material....but that does not necessarily mean it has gotten weaker or worst. They cannot be used in a way that you used a car from a decade ago (just like you can't use a present day Allion/Premio the same way you used a Carina from the 80s).

Thinking and saying that the older engines were built strong because they had to build large capacity engines to get X number of hp out of it is a very one dimensional way of looking at it.  We as a human race have actually figured out how to make things stronger with things we traditionally thought were weak. Eg. we can do a lot more things with Aluminium/Alloys which we used to do with pure steel and still make it stronger...

Like I said....certain components will have shortened service cycles; requiring them to be changed, services, etc... a bit lesser than in a N/A engine requiring us uses to change the way we use cars....but that does not mean the car was designed to just last around be unusable beyond 10 years. According to your logic we should expect yards upon yards of these cars rotting away in 10-15 years time because that is what the manufactures are planning (since there won't be any engines to replace the existing ones anyway).Again, not in the best interest of these companies to be so simplistic like that...the loss in reputation is far more costlier and longer term than anything else.  Now...whether we would still be using the current cars in 10-15 years time is a different story...for example if EVs and FCVs actually turn out to be winners then obviously a lot of people will give up theri Turbo charged Civics for Insights, and Leaves....then the fact that we buy cars that were not intended for our markets is a different story altogether.

Again..your point of view is exactly what people said when  new technologies came out. In the late 80s when Japanese cars were going EFI we said the same thing saying the sensors and computers won't last and that the car industry has changed that cars are built flimsily. We said the same thing about Hybrids; that they are made to have shorter lives  because.batteries don't last, interiors are made of plastic to save weight, etc...at the end of the day these cars are still running around. We say the same thing about Japanese kei cars...the turbo charged ones have been around for ages (not in SL..) and you still see them running. 

When the Japanese vehicles were going on and on, we said the same thing about European vehicles...that they are overly complicated, the build quality is weaker, etc...and that they will break down and be inoperable with time...yet we see plenty of them around (except Alfas of course..they just rotted away :D..c'mon had to make an Alfa joke)

The reason why the Japanese were not doing it is NOT because they didn't know how to do it...it was because they were doing extensive R&D, in fact down sized turbo charged engines had been show cased by the Japanese since the 80s (that I know of). Just like Hybrids and Electric vehicles were first played with by Mitsubishi since the 70s. 

So..it is not all doom and gloom.

Again...the issue is not with the technology...the issue is with people. People obviously will have old school views and expect to just put oil , petrol and run...(i.e. be cheap about it) and then it will break....and as I said before...it is not the tech that is bad..it is just that people are stuck in the 80s and 90s and are not willing to change with the times and instead blaming it on the present technologies (its not just cars...even our education system is not changing with times and is plagued because people are holding on to a success indicator that should have died of 3 decades ago). 

So lets agree to disagree.

 

 

Edited by iRage
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3 hours ago, BuBi said:

Do not get this engine confused with regular naturally aspirated engines machan. There are strong stresses affecting a turbo charged engine. You will not find the longevity of a normal engine from a turbo assisted engine. It is a physical certain. 

Manufacturers' do not care either. They are planning the obsolescence now. They don't want people to use their vehicles more than 10 years. It hurts countries like us of course. But, what can we do? 

P.S - Engine is the main component of a vehicle's reliability. Other parts contributes also but without the engine, nothing would matter. 

I'm no mechanic mate. Just watching videos like this one; Check 1:42 - 1:52.

 

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Posted (edited)
39 minutes ago, kmeeg said:

; Check 1:42 - 1:52.

I doubt if he has scientific facts to prove that engines with higher compression wear out faster in general. In that sense diesels should wear out sooner than petrols. Its all about build materials and design. However you need to be extra carefull with the oil system and air-system in a Turbocharged engine. For example a bad Air filter(rat damage) could let sand particles pass through and damage the Turbo and send metal parts into your engine.It could also damage the Oil seals,which is why Oil and filter changes need to be followed strictly. Usually they start leaking in the range of 100k-150k kms , reason for Turbo failures is mostly not a weakness in the Turbo-design itself,but other issues like oil sludge,oil filter, Air system etc.

Edited by vag2

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2 hours ago, kmeeg said:

I'm no mechanic mate. Just watching videos like this one; Check 1:42 - 1:52.

 

 

Scotty is right machan. Things get even worse for 1000cc 3 pot engines which are designed only to get better gas mileage and emission standards. 

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, BuBi said:

 

Things get even worse for 1000cc 3 pot engines which are designed only to get better gas mileage and emission standards

Actually 3cyl PFI NA engines run less efficient,and produce more particles/CO2 compared to a similar 4cyl delivering same power. But with direct injection,turbo,VVT,Vtec and gasoline Particule Filter they manage to fulfill Euro 6 standard while pulling reasonable HP with 1 cylinder less! Hope the European Direct injection system in the Civic does not fail like the Mitsubishi IO/Pajero system under our conditions. It's somewhat survived in 4cyl European cars in SL for about a decade now.

Edited by ajm
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Just FYI, this guy Scotty is a first world example of a makabass. I'd take his advice with a pinch of salt.

I have to agree with @iRage. Although turbocharged engines run higher compression over their NA counterparts, the engines themselves are built to withstand the additional stresses. On top of that, some manufacturers even recommend a stricter maintenance schedule for turbocharged cars.

The argument here is that wear can occur because the engine oil needs to keep lubricating the turbo in addition to the engine. If you carry out routine maintenance as per the manufacturer's recommendation, this shouldn't be an issue. For the new Honda Civic, it has an "engine oil monitor indicator" which illuminates not just by looking at the car's mileage, but by how the engine runs while cold and warm. So the car itself is already smart to notify the driver to change oil on time. So even if you drive your turbo car in a spirited fashion, I believe the indicator will light up sooner and tell you that you better change that oil. 

The other reason why I don't think small engines with turbo will fail is because all of the real life examples. European manufacturers like VW and Audi have already been using turbos on their small 1.2 and 1.4L engines for quite a long tome now. And I have seen some of these cars well past 200,000km with engines still running like brand new. I doubt Honda will be any different.

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4 hours ago, Davy said:

 

The other reason why I don't think small engines with turbo will fail is because all of the real life examples. European manufacturers like VW and Audi have already been using turbos on their small 1.2 and 1.4L engines for quite a long tome now. And I have seen some of these cars well past 200,000km with engines still running like brand new. I doubt Honda will be any different.

4

1.8L though. But this has run almost 700k kms! Not bad for a turbocharged car.

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