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Magnum

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Lets use this thread to share the automotive stuff we find on the internet. Videos, articles, pictures  you found interesting or used to do any DIY work.

I'll start off with few stuff. 

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Lugging your engine

I found this being done by many people to save fuel or just by being lazy to downshift.

 

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6 Different Types Of Turbocharger And The Advantages Of Each Setup

"What's the difference between single, twin, twin-scroll, variable geometry, or even electric turbochargers? What are the advantages of each setup"

https://www.carthrottle.com/post/engineering-explained-6-different-types-of-turbocharger-and-the-advantages-of-each-setup/

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Pretty surprising results

 

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In general terms, a wider tire has a greater contact patch with the ground, so can provide traction. The tread pattern/depth will have a lot to do with how the tire performs during inclement whether.

Take for instance a race tire which is rated at a width of 325mm.  this tire would provide excellent traction for the vehicle. And this would be true, unless the tire was driven on the street where there is water. The car would not have the traction needed to sustain type of safe operation.

Take the same 325mm tire and place it on snow. You can expect a loss of traction. In fact, a skinnier tire will work better in snow than a wide tire would. The reason for this (I believe ... no empirical evidence) is because it has more weight per square inch due to the smaller contact patch. It also cuts through to the ground better instead of riding on top of compacted snow.

There are other factors involved here as well. If a tire is made to last longer (say made of harder rubber), it may not have as good of traction as a tire of the same width and softer material. Tread patterns themselves have a play in traction. Side wall height, tire flex, and inflation also have a play in it.

Another area to consider is what is the physical dimensions of a tire will you be able to fit under your vehicle? There is a trade-off here as well. Another trade-off is cost, the wider the tire, the more expensive it will be (all other things being equal).

Unfortunately, there are so many variables when considering traction, you just cannot put a generalized statement upon a single given factor, which is width in your case. To provide the best tire for your application takes research, bringing all of the factors together to determine your best course.

Edited by Magnum

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The first successful usage of common rail fuel injection system in a production vehicle began in Japan by the mid-1990s. Dr. Shohei Itoh and Masahiko Miyaki of the Denso Corporation, a Japanese automotive parts manufacturer, developed the common rail fuel system for heavy duty vehicles and turned it into practical use on their ECD-U2 common-rail system mounted on the Hino Ranger truck and sold for general use in 1995. Denso claims the first commercial high pressure common rail system in 1995.

Edited by Magnum

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4 hours ago, Magnum said:

The first successful usage of common rail fuel injection system in a production vehicle began in Japan by the mid-1990s. Dr. Shohei Itoh and Masahiko Miyaki of the Denso Corporation

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_rail

"Modern common rail with electronic control for Passenger cars is an Italian invention taken over and developed for mass production by supplier Giant Bosch."

Edited by ajm

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3 hours ago, ajm said:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_rail

"Modern common rail with electronic control for Passenger cars is an Italian invention taken over and developed for mass production by supplier Giant Bosch."

This refers to the modern common rail system with an ECU. While my post refers to the earlier one. 

 

Oops! Just noticed I used the wrong pic -_-

Edited by Magnum
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The first mass-production passenger car with the common rail system used worldwide ubiquitously now was the Alfaromeo-JTD. The system was jointly developed by Bosch and Fiat group.

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J.D Power Vehicle Dependability Study

U.S

17_vds_chart_1.jpg

Japan

2017192a.jpg

Germany

2017105a.jpg

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The Drift King Story

dk1.jpg?resize=803%2C534

Keiichi Tsuchiya began racing at a young age as most great drivers do. As he was learning to drive he began experimenting with the side brake or E-brake lever. Sliding the back end of the car out and counter steering was fun and taught him the basics of car control. Unlike many great racecar drivers he did not go to a racing school or have a rich family that was into the racing scene that could nurture his racing talents. He just had the basic passion to drive. Driving through local mountain roads he began to build a sense of where a car needs to be at each turn to achieve maximum speed through a corner. This not being a safe and smart way of learning to race he never the less learned much from running (Touge) mountain pass roads. From time to time he found himself off a cliff with his KPGC10 Skyline or against the side of a wall. Having snow in the wintertime further trained him to drive well on loose surface conditions enhancing again his car control skill. The more he drove on these roads and conditions of various road surfaces he began to get comfortable with sliding the car through a corner. He started to drift not because it was a quicker way around a corner but it was the most exciting way.

Enter the Drift King. Drifting a car through a corner is not the fastest way around most turns any racecar driver will tell you strait out. This is where Keiichi Tsuchiya was crowned the Dori Kin or Drift King. In Option drift contests; style and technique are evaluated for exhibition values. Lately contests have been judged on racing lines and setup for multiple corner drifting, this is more difficult. Back in 1977 Keiichi began his racing career driving many different cars in amateur racing series events. Racing these underpowered cars was difficult but again a great learning experience. Later Keiichi was picked up to drive the ADVAN sponsored AE86/1984 Corolla GT-S. During many races on a downhill corner he would drift the car and carry a better corner speed than his competitors. This technique is what made him the Drift King not as most believe that he was first in the drift scene. As he proved his style of driving his reputation grew. He is a racecar driver now and still takes to the mountains for illegal racing this also made his reputation grow. After videos featuring him and his persistent mountain running/Drifting his driver’s license was suspended! For a professional racecar driver this was embarrassing. Unknowingly this worked to his advantage, his fan base and fame began to expand. You could say that he is a rebel of some sort or because he was just a person who went from nowhere to success out of determination with no racing background. He still has a bond for an old car that he grew up racing, drifting, and winning with, the Toyota AE86. You can see this by his video series dedicated to this car that is called AE86 Club. Toyota itself also felt that he is the person to represent the car most and presented him a restored AE86 through TRD. 

(Keiichi as a young fellow would go to Fuji speedway to watch skylines duke it out building him a foundation to get into the racing scene). 

Driving History: Keiichi Tsuchiya 

Born January 1956 
1977 Debut in Fuji Freshman series. 
1977-1984 Ran selected entries in All Japan Touring Car championship. 
1984 Fuji Freshman series race (Toyota AE86)= 6 wins 
1985 All Japan Touring Car championship (Toyota AE86) 1st in Class 3 
1986 Corolla Sprinter Cup-2 podium places 
1987 All Japan Touring Car championship (Honda Civic)-1 win 
1988 Toyota Cup-1st overall 
All Japan Touring Car championship (BMW M30)-3rd in Class 2 
Macau Guia race (BMW M3)-4th overall 
1989 All Japan F3 championship 
All Japan Touring Car championship (Ford Sierra Cosworth)-1 win 
1990 All Japan Touring Car championship (Ford Sierra Cosworth) 
Macau Guia race (Ford Sierra Cosworth) 
New Zealand Touring Car series (Toyota) 
1991 All Japan F3 championship (Ralt-Mugen)-10th overall 
All Japan Touring Car championship (Nissan Skyline GT-R)-5th overall 
1992 All Japan Touring Car championship (Nissan Skyline GT-R) 
1993 All Japan Touring Car championship (Taisan Nissan Skyline GT-R)-1 win 
Japan Endurance series (Honda Prelude)-2nd Tsukuba 12 Hours 
1994 All Japan GT championship (Porsche 911T)-1 win 
All Japan Touring Car championship (Honda Civic) 
Suzuka 1000kms (Porsche 911T)-1st in class, 2nd overall 
Le Mans 24 Hours (Honda NSX)-18th overall 
1995 All Japan GT championship (Porsche911TRSR) 
All Japan Touring Car championship (Honda Civic) 
Suzuka 1000kms (Honda NSX)-5th overall 
Tokachi 12 Hours (Honda NSX)-1st overall 
Le Mans 24 Hours (Honda NSX)-1st in class 
1996 All Japan GT championship (Honda NSX)-13th overall 
Entered NASCAR Thunder Special race at Suzuka 
Le mans 24 Hours (Honda NSX)-3rd in class 
1997 All Japan GT championship (Porsche 911/Dodge Viper) 
Fuji InterTec race (Toyota Chaser) 
Suzuka 1000kms (Lark McLaren F1 GTR)-9th overall 
Entered NASCAR Thunder Special race at Suzuka 
Le Mans 24 Hours (Lark McLaren F1 GTR)-qualified 10th, retired from race 
1998 All Japan Touring Car championship (Toyota Chaser)-7th overall 
All Japan GT championship (Toyota Supra)-8th overall 
Le Mans 24 Hours (Toyota GT-One)-9th overall 
NASCAR at the California Speedway. 
1999 Japan Touring Car Championship(Advan Altezza Touring car). 
2000-2001 he joined team ARTA racing a NSX once again in the All Japan GT championship.

http://fastdrifting.blogspot.com/2006/09/quotes-from-drift-king-keiichi.html

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