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iRage

The future of education sector in our country

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1 hour ago, Rumesh88 said:

Top examples are marketing, merchandising and corporate communication sectors in any industry. Do you know when it comes to recruitment, applicants with a fine educational background from free education fall far behind those with an average qualifications from some unheard of international schools simply because of their language capability? Remember private sector expects new recruits to work from day one.  They don't worry whether you had a free education or not. Also do not narrow your scope down to graduates and the top rung of the system. It is others who make up the greater portion.

Those are not industries but some job roles which need mainly communication skills. However, communication skills means huge subject which you can't easily get from international school leavers, but fortunately, in our business environment, just who can speak some English will get a chance (that's how our top marketing guys identified those job characteristics) so the people who can speak English would have high chance getting a job in that field. In that sense, yes, agreed with you.  

But, as a result of it, what happens? 

When a customer ask few deep questions related to technical, accounting or some other stuff related to the product or service, they will stuck. I have lots of same kind of personal experiences in professional as well as personal life for this scenario. As an example, no one could sell an insurance, credit card, even any product at car service station, etc. to me. When I ask 2 - 3 questions back, they stuck because they have no proper knowledge about the product they are marketing to me to convince me. I cant write my professional experiences here since its not ethical.  Anyway, Ok - you could say, they do not need thorough knowledge and they can transfer the customer to technical side. Yes It can be done. But unfortunately those people have no such qualities even to handle the customer professional way (I mean to transfer and handle inquiries professional way). Why, as you endorsed, organisation recruit them to work from day one do not pay attention to give a training related to the job. So, Where is the issue??

Above is general perspective but however, as all other cases, there are special characters even among those students who perform extremely well. No argument for them. 

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This is the oil change interval discussion all over again.

At the end of the day our education system from kindergarten to university is severely under resourced, lacks any proper standardization and regulation and evolution. As a result our children are deprived of a time and context relevant education. Instead they are drilled and groomed to sit for exams whilst other crucial aspects such as creativity, social skills, morality, etc.. are seconded or are simply culled off.

We no longer have one of Asia's best education systems. That was ion's ago and as typical of us Sri Lankans we hold on to and parade something which happened centuries ago. It is easier for us to hold on to our past than face the current situation and fix it. Because fixing it means choices between highways, empty airports, luxury cars vs. more schools, universities, etc...Yes, Sri Lanka had the highest literacy rate..maybe we still do...but personally in this day and age just having a literate society does not make it an educated society.

I don't think "International School/Private Uni" kids are any more or less smarter than the local school/uni kids. It is just that the ones who go to the International schools are subjected to a bit more all-round educational exposure than their local counterparts. Lets face it...kids doing London O and A Levels have time to study, do some sports, socialize, etc...whilst the local O and A level kids slave them selves at tuition classes 8 days a week. I know A LOT of people say London O and A level kids don't need to study because at the end of the day their parents will just simply get them in to a University. Simply not true. Their parent's money just pays for tuition...not the entrance in to the university nor their eventual graduation (at least that is the case in PROPER Universities...not the 101 hacks you see all over the place).  Then again you can't blame people for thinking so because in all our unregulated glory; any idiot can start a private university with a foreign name stuck on it and hand out degrees from lord knows where.

So..yeah....lets not kid ourselves....

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Free education creates a lot of graduates who think they are the best (note I said 'a lot' and not all). I came through the system and I know it to some extent. Luckily I and quite a few others realized this early so did not fall into the same category. Yes, these graduates, depending on the field have better technical knowledge but mostly it stops there. Some know only what they learnt and are not updated on new developments, do not bother about soft skills. Those who thrived and made it far excelled in those and also did their own research. Not even fraction of these jobs in the country require those top technical knowledge. Take the maintenance booklet that was published - does that even look like a professional document? Does the job complete with only giving contents and no finishing? Just an example.

@gayanath IESL is a very active organization but as a percentage of total engineering graduates, how many are active with it? How many actually work in their respective field doing work using knowledge acquired by their free education? How many of them have made it long way up the ladder? And how long did it take them to get there? You need not ask for examples from others if you actually have the understanding of common corporate organization.

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13 hours ago, NPP said:

Free education creates a lot of graduates who think they are the best (note I said 'a lot' and not all).

I believe this is an old public opinion towards graduates. but now, with the advancement of IT and social media even the graduates are well aware about how the world behave. There are so many non graduates are in top positions as well as graduates under performing and vice versa. So, why they still think so?. Anyway, in every society, there are people who think they are the best ....... what to do? 

Quote

I came through the system and I know it to some extent. Luckily I and quite a few others realized this early so did not fall into the same category.

Great .....

Quote

Yes, these graduates, depending on the field have better technical knowledge but mostly it stops there. Some know only what they learnt and are not updated on new developments, do not bother about soft skills. Those who thrived and made it far excelled in those and also did their own research. Not even fraction of these jobs in the country require those top technical knowledge.

That's why I always in the view that SL has no proper systematic approach to take the required output from those graduates or even non graduates. You have to accept that, learning habit is depend on the job requirement or financial situation of individual. (Do you learn further if you have no money to invest?, But you will do it if your employer will fund you and allow you duty leaves) There are few individuals who are enthusiastic for learning and update new developments and they will do it either who fund them or not. 

 

Quote

Take the maintenance booklet that was published - does that even look like a professional document? Does the job complete with only giving contents and no finishing? Just an example.

I will reply all regarding this via relevant thread soon. I saw your comment on that thread and comprehensive reply for your points will receive soon. Until then,

If you read that, you could realize, it has compiled with little hurry. The committee needed to publish it at Techno 2016. The team has done everything withing few days (please note that every minute used for the work is on volunteer based) under the basis of "something is better than nothing". Therefore, yes, we have to accept there are several shortcomings. That's how Sri Lankan engineers used to find a time for CSR work with their professional and personal commitments. Any how, I don't know whether you could understand the concept  behind the book. 

The committee's aspect was, initially, publish this with simplest way.

1. Minimum pages with small descriptions (otherwise, no body will read),

2. More white background in pages (easy to read), and Some pictures for reading comfort. 

That's why it has compiled in report format rather than advanced publication. Still, even it has not in the status to forwarded to the IESL council for approval. 

Some thing is there you to comment now, than nothing. Let's improve it for our nation. Take everything positively and please comment about not only about the typesetting and the format, but regarding the content as well. 

 

Quote

@gayanath IESL is a very active organization but as a percentage of total engineering graduates, how many are active with it?

With 19000+ membership, yes, around 500+ are actively participated for matters two three years before. However, in that sense, IESL is far better than most of other institutions in Sri Lanka. But with new membership management system, participation is increasing tremendously since last year and hope several positive things in future. 

Quote

How many actually work in their respective field doing work using knowledge acquired by their free education? How many of them have made it long way up the ladder? And how long did it take them to get there? 

I don't know who are you. Even if you are an engineer in profession (may be not), this statement shows your less understanding about engineering field. By which knowledge are they working?? At-least be patient about CEB engineers (I m not working in CEB) who are giving 24/7 uninterrupted supply with this corrupted political and economical system and inefficient labor force.   

Generally speaking, our general public is not aware about what engineering is? Lets forget it. Do our people know the difference between a doctor or consultant doctor? 

Lets be optimistic ......... 

 

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53 minutes ago, gayanath said:

 

I don't know who are you. Even if you are an engineer in profession (may be not), this statement shows your less understanding about engineering field. By which knowledge are they working?? At-least be patient about CEB engineers (I m not working in CEB) who are giving 24/7 uninterrupted supply with this corrupted political and economical system and inefficient labor force.   

What NPP highlighted was the predicament faced by the Engineering professionals reaching to the top of the corporate rung. If you read page 17 of a research report by J'pura Uni- https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kennedy_Gunawardana/publication/286239443_Analysis_of_Intellectual_Capital_Disclosure_Practices_of_the_Annual_Reports_of_Listed_Companies_in_Sri_Lanka/links/56753f4308ae125516e660f1.pdf?origin=publication_list

It says Quote:

Even in the near future, the majority of Sri Lankan large corporate sector will be led by foreign educated or professionals with finance, economic and/or management qualifications than the graduates from Sri Lankan universities. Qualified engineers reaching the top corporate positions will be extremely low.

Unquote:

Personally this is not a position I am proud of. But this is the sad truth. Even in high tech engineering based telcos - the field I know better than any other - it is always the "others" who get better packages and opportunity to rise up the corporate ladder not the engineers.

Now can you blame NPP for having a less understanding on the engineering profession?

Edited by Rumesh88
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23 hours ago, iRage said:

This is the oil change interval discussion all over again.

@iRage

Yes, oil change discussion with an IT guy ... ha... ha.... (pardon me, emoticons are not working on my office PC)

 

Quote

At the end of the day our education system from kindergarten to university is severely under resourced, lacks any proper standardization and regulation and evolution. As a result our children are deprived of a time and context relevant education. Instead they are drilled and groomed to sit for exams whilst other crucial aspects such as creativity, social skills, morality, etc.. are seconded or are simply culled off.

Absolutely correct. 

Quote

We no longer have one of Asia's best education systems. That was ion's ago and as typical of us Sri Lankans we hold on to and parade something which happened centuries ago. It is easier for us to hold on to our past than face the current situation and fix it. Because fixing it means choices between highways, empty airports, luxury cars vs. more schools, universities, etc...Yes, Sri Lanka had the highest literacy rate..maybe we still do...but personally in this day and age just having a literate society does not make it an educated society.

Though there are several drawbacks in our education system, It's is not the basic issue/reason for the real problem our country facing. If we try to solve the matter by changing education system, yes we could do, but we have to change our education system just like Japan (to biuld a disciplinary nation) and have to expect results by 2040 or 50 when those child become younger. 

Let's propose alternatives for better nation. 

 

Quote

I don't think "International School/Private Uni" kids are any more or less smarter than the local school/uni kids. It is just that the ones who go to the International schools are subjected to a bit more all-round educational exposure than their local counterparts. Lets face it...kids doing London O and A Levels have time to study, do some sports, socialize, etc...whilst the local O and A level kids slave them selves at tuition classes 8 days a week.

Agreed. But why?, being the no of students are less, no much competitiveness among London O and A level students (and the future is more or less depend on the amount the money could spend by their parents.) Do local O and A level students became slaves due to a error in the syllabus.?

Who send them for bunch of tuition classes. Do it really required?  Their poor parents have fallen them to the well.  

What is the outcome? Student has learn the subject (whether the correct way and the correct environment should it be learned or not) before the school teacher teach them (specially in A/L). Then he (or she) not required no interest to learn it again. Knowing this, teachers gradually used to start doing only practicals and let students to behave as they wish. (my personal experiences at AL but its far better than current situation) Finally, GoSL pays for teachers, but sitting in the class room or doing their own work and parents pay tuition fees (for same teacher some times) for education. Yes its true, students have no time for sports, etc. 

What should we do? 

Lets discuss if you have time in future. The most important thing should not be discussing the current system but propose concrete (as well as practical) solutions fro future. 

 

 

Edited by gayanath

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On 11/23/2016 at 2:09 PM, gayanath said:

Those are not industries but some job roles which need mainly communication skills. However, communication skills means huge subject which you can't easily get from international school leavers, but fortunately, in our business environment, just who can speak some English will get a chance (that's how our top marketing guys identified those job characteristics) so the people who can speak English would have high chance getting a job in that field. In that sense, yes, agreed with you.  

But, as a result of it, what happens? 

When a customer ask few deep questions related to technical, accounting or some other stuff related to the product or service, they will stuck. I have lots of same kind of personal experiences in professional as well as personal life for this scenario. As an example, no one could sell an insurance, credit card, even any product at car service station, etc. to me. When I ask 2 - 3 questions back, they stuck because they have no proper knowledge about the product they are marketing to me to convince me. I cant write my professional experiences here since its not ethical.  Anyway, Ok - you could say, they do not need thorough knowledge and they can transfer the customer to technical side. Yes It can be done. But unfortunately those people have no such qualities even to handle the customer professional way (I mean to transfer and handle inquiries professional way). Why, as you endorsed, organisation recruit them to work from day one do not pay attention to give a training related to the job. So, Where is the issue??

Above is general perspective but however, as all other cases, there are special characters even among those students who perform extremely well. No argument for them. 

Unfortunately you seem to have no idea about marketing at all. First look up what marketing is,  marketing is not sale.  Marketing is definitely not limited to the guy trying to give you a credit card or insurance at the petrol station (although I have no idea why anyone would even try to do that). The guy selling those obviously only needs selling skills. 

Do you know what a brand Manger does? Do you know a product manager does?  Do you know what people who are in a market research function do? 

You say marketers require only communication skills? Explain the role of how a brand manager increases sales, increase brand recall,  new product development,  balances the p&l using only communication skills.

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2 hours ago, The Stig said:

Unfortunately you seem to have no idea about marketing at all. First look up what marketing is,  marketing is not sale.  Marketing is definitely not limited to the guy trying to give you a credit card or insurance at the petrol station (although I have no idea why anyone would even try to do that). The guy selling those obviously only needs selling skills. 

Do you know what a brand Manger does? Do you know a product manager does?  Do you know what people who are in a market research function do? 

You say marketers require only communication skills? Explain the role of how a brand manager increases sales, increase brand recall,  new product development,  balances the p&l using only communication skills.

@The Stig

Yes, Accepted. I have less knowledge about marketing field. 

However, I have just only answered for Rumesh88's query which highlighted job opportunities which international school leaver (having just language skills) could get more preference than ordinary qualified guy. 

Can those positions (roles of brand managers, product managers, market researchers) to be taken over by partly qualified language skilled personals ? What I thought was those positions needs some more analytical skills than language proficiency. Therefore I have not even thought about those. :) 

 

Edited by gayanath

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2 hours ago, gayanath said:

@iRage

Yes, oil change discussion with an IT guy ... ha... ha.... (pardon me, emoticons are not working on my office PC)

 

This is a prime example of what's wrong with the education system of our country. BSc (Engineering) people do not OWN the field of engineering. IT guys, doctors, marketeers, jobless bums and pretty much anyone can READ and understand concepts and present a solid argument. Justin Trudeau, despite not being a physicist or an IT guy, explained quantum computing. Had it been in Sri Lanka, i'm sure some people would have been up in arms about that too. In other countries, knowledge is respected. In Sri Lanka, paper is respected more.

Ironically, the 'IT guy' explained the engineering philosophy behind frequent oil changes and the 'engineer' was talking about patriotism and macroeconomics as I recall from that conversation.

 

 

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32 minutes ago, Crosswind said:

This is a prime example of what's wrong with the education system of our country. BSc (Engineering) people do not OWN the field of engineering. IT guys, doctors, marketeers, jobless bums and pretty much anyone can READ and understand concepts and present a solid argument.

Ironically, the 'IT guy' explained the engineering philosophy behind frequent oil changes and the 'engineer' was talking about patriotism and macroeconomics as I recall from that conversation. 

@Crosswind,

We are living in the country where, people taken the set of drawings of their proposed two or three storied house (which drawn by charted structural and/or a civil engineer) to a astrologist to check whether those are correct or not. And the funniest thing would be, astrologist may propose to change a pillar or a position of a wall and poor house owner will be accepting it with no arguments and ask engineer to do it whether he will accept or not. Astrologist's words are solid for our people than engineer's who design multi storied building complexes. 

-- big story by short way --

So, nothing to worry, we have to be patient ......

 

Edited by gayanath
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4 hours ago, Rumesh88 said:

What NPP highlighted was the predicament faced by the Engineering professionals reaching to the top of the corporate rung. If you read page 17 of a research report by J'pura Uni- https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kennedy_Gunawardana/publication/286239443_Analysis_of_Intellectual_Capital_Disclosure_Practices_of_the_Annual_Reports_of_Listed_Companies_in_Sri_Lanka/links/56753f4308ae125516e660f1.pdf?origin=publication_list

It says Quote:

Even in the near future, the majority of Sri Lankan large corporate sector will be led by foreign educated or professionals with finance, economic and/or management qualifications than the graduates from Sri Lankan universities. Qualified engineers reaching the top corporate positions will be extremely low.

Unquote:

Personally this is not a position I am proud of. But this is the sad truth. Even in high tech engineering based telcos - the field I know better than any other - it is always the "others" who get better packages and opportunity to rise up the corporate ladder not the engineers.

Now can you blame NPP for having a less understanding on the engineering profession?

Still yes,

Did you read the full report. How many companies among those (sample of 15), doing their core business falling under the category of "Engineering". Therefore, its questionable whether the sample used is rational to evaluate the performance of engineers? but, yes, looking those 15, sadly it shows the truth  that our economy is still unsuccessful to be knowledge base and governing by services, trading, agricultural sectors (where engineering staff will be less important).

Further, under Limitations,  (page 20) it says,

Quote... 

Fifthly, in the perspectives of universities, the paper only looked at the final outcome or the product but not the internal processes or the issues faced by the universities to produce graduates to match with the need of the industry

...unQuote.

which is also relevant to our previous discussions. 

It guys lets comment. this analysis says, (page 11)

Quote... 

Software Development industry in Sri Lanka emerged in mid-eighties while BPM, KPO and design industries are still at the infant or child stage. Though from time to time there have been talks at Sri Lankan higher echelons to develop the IT/BPM industry. But nothing much has been done to date while neighboring India has made their brand known world over.  

...unQuote.

 

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12 hours ago, gayanath said:

 

   

Still yes,

Did you read the full report. How many companies among those (sample of 15), doing their core business falling under the category of "Engineering". Therefore, its questionable whether the sample used is rational to evaluate the performance of engineers? but, yes, looking those 15, sadly it shows the truth  that our economy is still unsuccessful to be knowledge base and governing by services, trading, agricultural sectors (where engineering staff will be less important).

 

@gayanath - That itself is the proof that, in spite of having offered Engineering Degrees for over six decades and much hype over the "best system in Asia", we still do not have blue chip companies doing their core business falling under the category "Engineering" as you say (except perhaps a few telcos). Thank you for your comment. That alone speaks volumes on the quality of graduates (those few quality graduates find opportunities elsewhere) produced by the system.  Do I need to add more?

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4 hours ago, Rumesh88 said:

@gayanath - That itself is the proof that, in spite of having offered Engineering Degrees for over six decades and much hype over the "best system in Asia", we still do not have blue chip companies doing their core business falling under the category "Engineering" as you say (except perhaps a few telcos). Thank you for your comment. That alone speaks volumes on the quality of graduates (those few quality graduates find opportunities elsewhere) produced by the system.  Do I need to add more?

Still need.

@Rumesh88 - In SL, this scenario is common not only for Engineering but also for all other disciplines as well. (adding that, though the top positions of this blue chip companies were evaluated, the report not saying anything about whether they are gradually improving or not).

1. Lets keep engineering aside. As you said, except teleco (its based on engineering though) and banking (even in banking sector, the quality of the service improved a lot but volume wise ?. They are depending on low risk vehicle leasing and personal and housing loans and nothing given for SME's to develop their businesses) which sector improved? At-least IT which need comparatively low initial capital? - do not try counter arguments mentioning one or two companies which has improved during last few years due to various other reasons such as political favoritism, bribery, tax deals, etc. 

2. Lets keep Sri Lankan engineering graduates aside. Could foreign engineering graduates successfully uplift the Engineering category businesses in Sri Lanka? 

3. Now Lets keep all Sri Lankan graduates aside. Could foreign graduates successfully uplift the Sri Lankan business/economical environment last few decades except holding some top positions of few companies?  

We have to be rational before comment. Are we rational to use this figures to evaluate the quality of our graduates?

We should identify the real cause/factors behind the issues my friend. 

 

 

 

Edited by gayanath

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4 hours ago, gayanath said:

 

2. Lets keep Sri Lankan engineering graduates aside. Could foreign engineering graduates successfully uplift the Engineering category businesses in Sri Lanka? 

3. Now Lets keep all Sri Lankan graduates aside. Could foreign graduates successfully uplift the Sri Lankan business/economical environment last few decades except holding some top positions of few companies?  

We have to be rational before comment. Are we rational to use this figures to evaluate the quality of our graduates?

We should identify the real cause/factors behind the issues my friend. 

 

I don't have a large sample size...however...from personal experience...yes..the returning kids I know of are making a difference.  Have met quite a lot of returnees through the WorkInSriLanka platform/forum.

There are quite a few economics/management/finance graduates who have returned and are working at local and foreign banks who I have dealt with. The difference I have seen is that the returnees have a sense of confidence and are willing to come forward with suggestions and take risks. The "locals" <I really hate using these terms like this..feels very discriminatory> on the other hand are too restrained. As a result they simply regress by stating "this is how it was always done" and just end there.

As for the more hard scientists...I know nano-scientists who have come to Sri Lanka and who have actually setup and are working on some government project or something...then there are a few bio-chemical engineers who have set up labs over here. Even the "Dr."  with the Vega team is a returnee...(the Vega project itself's commercial viability is questionable but at least there are things like commercial research in to battery technology, etc...is going on). Then I know quite a few who work in the UN system working on urban development...then there are returning expats who have setup or are funding incubators and advisory services for entrepreneurs...so..yes...the ones who have dared to return with their foreign education actually are making a difference. Don't forget...even if you take the few large successful IT companies in the country..most of them were started off by returnees who created a bridge between resource bases in the US and EU (they established whilst learning/working over there) and SL....so yes... 

The biggest problem is most do not return because their prospects after returning are not attractive. Even the ones who have returned, the problem is the blacklash from the bureaucracy and the the small group of locally educated individuals who make assimilation rather difficult.

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This is probably a different take on things. 

Having seen a lot of the facets of the problems being discussed (I'm an Arts graduate and now a Product Manager for an IT company, so go figure.)  have to agree that we have a systematic problem.

When I was at Uni, majority of the Arts students were specialising in History and Sinhala. While that looks OK on the surface, why on earth would someone decide to spend 4 years studying something that has little positive impact on the economy and society is beyond me. It's not as if these people engage in critical thinking or constructive learning while they learn. They just memorise a set of notes brought down through the generations of lecturers. ( I understand the logistical issues of A/Ls that these people go through - Most schools don't offer A/L or offer only three Arts subjects, etc.) But why won't they take up a course like Management or Economics when they get to Uni is hard to understand. When you get to do an Arts degree, most often than not, you get to select your subjects anew. As far as I can remember, there's nothing stopping you from doing completely different subjects than you offered for your A/Ls.  

 After getting the degree they depend on the Government to provide them jobs. It's perfect f**k logic situation. Anyway, that's too broad a topic to tackle. 

Our grads are good and they do conduct very good semi-self-funded research. Just go here. https://opensource.googleblog.com/2016/06/more-statistics-from-google-summer-of.html 

University of Moratuwa produced the largest number of Google Summer of Code participants during 2005-2016. While UoM produced 320, the second largest is from IIT, Hyderabad with a paltry 252. So our students are both capable and driven. 

But that's where things end. GSoC is an academic/research programme. Whereas in almost all corporate environments, people with well-rounded soft skills thrive. You don't have to be an Engineering graduate or an IT graduate, if you have good soft skills, chances of you moving up the ladder goes up exponentially. If you have a good core competency to go with that, all the more better. 

Regardless of whether you come from a foreign university/local university/no degree or whatever, it's passion, inquisitiveness and relentlessness that gets you places. Unfortunately, it's very hard to find these on people who pass out from local universities.

Then there are such outliers like Mr. Rohan Pallewatte who is has a Bachelor's in English, an Attorney-at-Law and the chairman of a seat belt company - that want to exceed the Six Sigma standard -  who supply seat belts for companies like Aston Martin. http://www.01awards.lk/speakers/rohan-pallewatta/ (This is a job for an Engineer, no?)

So not everything is black and white. 

 

Edited by Sierra Charlie

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See that is the thing Sierra....the system is fundamentally restrictive. Due to the limited resources and non standardization what is offered to our kids is limited and they are not given the opportunity to expand in other areas. Instead we pout around saying we have Asia's best education system and highest literacy levels and publish reports about how xx,xxx of kids have failed simply because they are not good at memorizing and rewriting it at a test !

Gayanath...you asked two questions and stated a fact

1. How do London O and A schools manage to provide a better experience ?

Well I think several aspects contribute; of them

one could be that at the end of the day....even if you get low grades for A/Ls you still have some sort of option for a foreign University (even a low rated barn no one has ever heard of is there for you to go study). So the actual mechanism itself is not a win-all or lose-all kind of a scenario. In some cases the final University entrance exam is independant to the A/L or High School experience.

Secondly, parents pay a lot of money to these schools, therefore, they demand their monies worth.It is a matter of staying in business for these schools. true it might seem like a very capitalistic view of education but that actually does have its positive impacts.

2. Irrespective of the debate you did ask how we can change it to the better....I say put more resources in to the system. Build adequate schools, setup/expand the university system. If the government can't mobilize itself quickly enough..fine let the private schools and universities take over the void..however REGULATE and STANDARDIZE ! That way people are not paying for the degree per say..but access to the resources. If you don't work hard and pass you don't get the degree...unlike the current situation where if the kids are being lazy then the standard of passing lowers as well.

Personally I think there should be continuous assessment rather than the end-all exam at the end. Also, do SL universities (Govt and Private) have entrance interviews ? If not..why not ? (don't kids have interviews..or at least parents have it...when getting in to schools like Royal, Thomas', etc... ? Why not for University as well)

....you mentioned about the Japanese education system. Well the Japanese education system has its own flaws (so would any other system) but yes it does teach a lot of values (in fact it is literally drilled in to them). When my son started kindergarten over there I was upset with them because in SL he was learning to write and read at kindergarten ! In Japan all I saw him do was play and listen and talk stories about each other. In Japan the first few years of school are 80% focused on teaching the children being in a part of a community and respecting one another. The stories they tell each other apparently were about their best friends and families and pets and the beauty of sakura flowers and the mountains...(so yeah...I felt kind of like a huge ass).

As for discipline. It starts way way before school. Even my one year old daughter has to sit properly in one place say thanks to the food (itadakimasu) and eat and then say thanks again (gotsoosamadeshita). Each meal has to be accompanied by tooth brushing...etc., they can create what ever mess they want but before going to sleep cleaning up is a must if not their toys will be not there the next morning (I know sounds harsh). Then again society, culture and their believes are setup in a way that helps it. For example Japanese believe that there is a god in the toilet. Thus, cleaning the toilet (and using it cleanly) is actually giving thanks to the gods....Even staying in line....you do not have the option of cutting in line. You cut in line the person providing the service will send you back and not give you what you want anyway....

Edited by iRage
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On 11/22/2016 at 11:30 AM, matroska said:

most people do it for some sort of accomplishment i guess... i have many friends in their late 20s early 30's who do an MSc/MBa for no apparent reason(these guys are working in the Private Sector where MBA won't actually get you far) other than upload 589 photos on Facebook (feeling great - at BMICH) on the Master's graduation and for 1189 people to like it and 945 people to comment 'congrats mchn' 'well done bro' 

 

100% agree on that I have few friend like that :D

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Hmm.. these viewpoints are quite interesting. I'd like to add my own perspective.

I have talked to quite a few high ranking executives, sometimes by chance, sometimes by choice. From what I've gathered, they all seem to have a completely different perspective.

What these executives look for in a person are normally 2-3 things, Attitude, Social skills, and Problem solving skills. 

Why attitude? Skills can be taught, knowledge can be imparted, but one's attitude cannot be changed. So those with a good, positive attitude are sought after.

Why social skills? By this I don't mean conversational skills alone. I'm also talking about dispute resolution skills, EQ etc.

Why problem solving skills? All companies seek to do business, and business is all about solving problem. And these problems don't come with prior warning and practice exercises like exams do.

So, at the end of the day, the hiring decision boils down to this. The truth is, even if you have a Ph.D from Harvard, it will only help you get your foot in the door. Once you get the job, it's all about your tenacity, drive, and on-the-job performance.

The thing with the local education system is that it encourages people to stay in their comfort zone, doesn't force them to challenge their assumptions about what they've learned. Perhaps this is why for instance, people who study engineering think that they absolutely must pursue a career in engineering, even though they have no interest in the field.

The local education system doesn't help its students to realise that they live in a great big world where one's academic credentials don't have to dictate their future. Just because you study medicine doesn't mean that you have to become a doctor. If you like branding, there is nothing stopping you from becoming a branding professional instead.

This same problem is prevalent in the British system too. But that is not the case in the American system. Maybe that explains why the US leads the world in terms of innovation.

Just my two cents though :)

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Since 30 - 40 years, GoSL gradually reduced the investment for public transportation (CTB and Railway) and promoted private intervention (private busses). Due to several small scale personals involving this bus industry and GoSL is failing to properly regulate those, now
1.    Bus owners only paying attention to the amount of money they can earn, but not about the quality of service. They are well benefitted with the profit they could earn. So no need to improve the quality 
2.    No trained drivers, trained conductors, no quality buses, no humanitarian 
3.    Quality of public transportation system not improved. Nobody will receive a quality service. 
4.    Due to that, majority of first, upper and lower middle class people started using personal transportation or taxi with higher cost. Poor third class and few lower middle class using law quality private buses or CTB (those too law in quality because of low investment) since they have no other option.
5.    Plus it has developed “three wheel” culture. 
6.    4 and 5 has increased road traffic congestion
7.    Road traffic congestion affected to the entire economic development of the country
8.    Created “thugs” driven bus culture - no customer focused
9.    Even GoSL couldn’t implement a traffic law and those people are intervening by strikes, etc.  
10.    While their strike, even government busses are on threat and lost their windscreens/side glasses. 
11.    GoSL unable to issue a new route permit for luxury bus system without consent from those thugs.  

All above issue are due to the failure/incompetency of proper regulatory system

Let’s apply those lessons learned to Education. 
GoSL is promoting Private education to save money for their benefits. 
What will happen at the end of the day……..
 

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