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Crosswind

The Ford Focus Thread

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It’s been over a year since I bought my Focus and looking at the way the car has behaved and the knowledge I gathered about the car, I thought of starting a thread for the benefit of current and future Ford Focus users (if any are around in Autolanka) to share general information about the car.

I hope to keep this thread alive by adding content from time to time. Any useful contributions are welcome, but I hope OT will be avoided (or deleted by Mods).

Ford Focus in Sri Lanka and Europe

According to Wikipedia, Focus was introduced by Ford of Europe, back in 1998 as a replacement for its longstanding model, Escort. By 2012, Focus had undergone, two model changes and it’s presently at its third generation (known as MkIII). The first model to be officially introduced to Sri Lanka, was the facelift version of the second generation (known as Mk 2.5). There are few second-hand imported (reconditioned) Mk 1 and 2 Focuses (of Foci, if you wish to be pedantic) running around in Sri Lankan streets. They were sourced either from UK or Singapore.

Focus has been the best selling model in England for a few years. It has been used as police cars, taxis and as personal transport over there.

The Mk 2.5 Focus (referred to as 2011 Focus from hereon), was offered in either manual or auto-transmission with varying trim levels, with the top of the range version being offered with factory-fitted 17” alloy wheels, leather seats, cruise control, dual-mode climate control AC and an electric sunroof. Thanks to the ridiculous tax system in Sri Lanka, only one engine-option was offered, which was the 1.6ltr Duratec Petrol engine. The 2011 Focus was sourced from the plant in Valencia, Spain. Around 50 cars were brought to Sri Lanka in 2011. Only two body styles (sedan and hatchback) was offered.
ford-focus-2009-pics.jpg

Mk III (referred to as 2012 Focus), was launched in Sri Lanka in 2012 with three body styles (sedan, hatchback and crossover SUV) was offered with the option of petrol and diesel engines. The petrol engine offered, was the same as its predecessor. Most significant change in this model was the difference in body styling. The highest trim level included a Sony music system, daytime driving lights as well as all the options offered in its predecessor. 2012 Focus was sourced from Ford’s Saarlouis plant in Germany.

2012-ford-focus-studio-0.jpg

Review of 2011 Focus – The Good and the Bad

(I posted this information in an earlier thread)

The Good:

  • The 2011 Focus was really value for money at that time. However, things appear to have changed now. The top of the range version was 5.2 Million at a time when reconditioned Allions were sold for around 5.8. However, the 2012 Focus (as of October 2012) starts at 7.6 Million and goes on to 9.4 Million.
  • Handling and safety-wise, the Focus seems to be far superior than most of the Japanese cars seen on the road.
  • Focus, being Ford Europe’s most popular car, is customized to suit various conditions, including the ‘extreme conditions’ found in Sri Lanka. It’s got very good ground clearance (Usually comes with 16 or 17 inch wheels and stands much taller than many of the cars in the market), Not very complicated electronics, Mechanical power steering etc.
  • Leather interior appears to be more durable than other cars
  • Warranty is given for 3 years/40000km

The Bad:

  • 1.6Ltr engine is underpowered. It's sluggish on pick-up.
  • Suspension is a bit stiff (At first, I thought this is because of the cars supplied for Sri Lanka being made for extreme conditions, but The Don says it's the same with European market cars)
  • The one with leather seats are a bit uncomfortable than the fabric ones
  • Should only run on 95-Octane
  • Duratec engine is noisy. Sounds like a diesel car.
  • Power steering is stiffer than a Japanese car.
  • 'Resale value' cannot be expected

Known Issues:

  • The 2012 Focus is known to have issues with the fuel pump/fuel rail because of the substandard petrol in Sri Lanka. The 2011 Focus may also face the same issue (I’m preparing myself, in case if this problem happens)
  • The agents are a big issue. They seem to get the basic things wrong because they are so used to maintaining cheap Daihatsus. Also they give dumb advices like asking you to pump Octane 90, when all the literature clearly mentions that 95 should be pumped. If all else fails, I’m planning do at least the basic maintenance work myself.
  • With time, washer jet seals can leak water into the spark plug cover, causing engine misfires
  • Stock brake pads are of poor quality.

Service Information for 2011 Focus

  • Type of Engine oil used: 10W-30 (any decent brand is acceptable really. Earlier, the agent used Toyota oil but they switched to Castrol later. Looks like Softlogic is running the agency for Castrol as well. About 4 liters of oil, are required. Ford recommended engine oil is Motorcraft. That's just because Ford owns Motorcraft.
  • Type of oil filter: Model code is 90915-YZZD2, which is the same filter used in Toyota 141s.
  • Currently the cost of a full service at the agent stands at about Rs. 5000, if the air filter is not changed.
  • Where to get spares: The current agent (Softlogic) stocks necessary spares and they are not as expensive as they are thought to be. Although the cars are sourced from Europe, most of the spares are sourced from Thailand/Phillipines. Otherwise, eBay.co.uk has to be the most economical source for spares.
  • The All-Important Fuel Economy figures: If you drive the car the way a Euro should be driven, you ought to get about 9 to the litre in mixed traffic. However, I am also aware that some guy was complaining he only got 6 to the litre.
Edited by Crosswind
  • Like 4

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Ford Focus Self-Diagnostic

One of the lesser known features of the Focus, is its self-diagnostic testing ability. A user can do a few tests on their own to determine any issues. I understand that most of the Fords carry the same tests and probably most of the Euros also have similar features.

I can’t take credit to discovering any of these. Most of this knowledge comes from Ford Forums on the Internet. But I have verified that this will work with Foci imported to Sri Lanka.

In the Sri Lankan context, following would be the most important tests.

Gauge Sweep – check if all gauges are working

Alarm check – Check If all (sound alarms) are working

LED Check – Check if all LEDs are working. As time goes by and these cars get in to the hands of resellers, chances are that some of the LEDs may be rewired to prevent trouble indicators from getting displayed. If one is buying a second hand Focus, this will be a useful test.

ODO Rollback count – Shows whether the odometer is rolled back. Again, very useful if one is buying a second hand Focus. If the Japanese were at least a little bit thoughtful on this one, then half the car salesmen in Sri Lanka will be out of business!

Diagnostic Trouble Codes – Shows whether the car’s diagnostic system has recorded any trouble codes. This is usually a paid service at garages. Self-diagnostic and Google makes life much easier for Focus owners.

Battery Voltage – shows the current battery voltage. User can check if the battery is properly functional on their own, instead of relying on con-men at battery shops.

Engine Temperature – Feel that the engine is running too warm? Just check the exact temperature!

How To:

  1. Insert the key and keep it on position I on the key way
  2. Press the Set/Reset button on the signal arm and hold it
  3. Turn the key to position III (ignition) but don’t start the car. If you have the lights, radio and A/C on, you can turn them off to prevent draining the battery.
  4. Hold the Set/Reset button for 10 seconds or until the display shows TEST
  5. All tests will happen in sequence and all you need to do, is to keep pressing the Set/Reset button to traverse through tests
  6. Once the tests are done, switch off the car (move the key back to position I) to finish the tests.

35a6stf.jpg

  • Like 5

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seems like you bought a Focus?

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@Schiffer - I bought a Focus over a year ago buddy!

Good choice mate. my dads a ford focus fan, he had a old sedan focus.

how much was it?

and permission to steal this DIY self diagnose for my fb page? :)

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Good choice mate. my dads a ford focus fan, he had a old sedan focus.

how much was it?

and permission to steal this DIY self diagnose for my fb page? :)

Prices are mentioned in the first post ;)

Of course you can steal the DIY. I have a few more stuff that you can do with the Focus. Will post them when I get time. Cheers.

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Prices are mentioned in the first post ;)

Of course you can steal the DIY. I have a few more stuff that you can do with the Focus. Will post them when I get time. Cheers.

oh bugger i missed that.

and thanks mate :)

https://www.facebook.com/notes/petrolhead/diy-ford-focus-self-diagnostic/130884020395667

Edited by Schiffer

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Crosswind, I think the Focuses in Europe also has fairly stiff suspension. It is not really a feature of the "rough roads package" but an attempt by Ford to give a good drive and stability with little body roll.

Also the Focus is quite heavy and a feature of the first generation Focuses was a tough body shell with hardly any body flex, which might still being carried forward. This was because the Focus was first designed with a Rally car in mind, and unlike Mitsubishi and Subaru, they are still a force to be reckoned with in Rallying.

Edited by The Don

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Crosswind, I think the Focuses in Europe also has fairly stiff suspension. It is not really a feature of the "rough roads package" but an attempt by Ford to give a good drive and stability with little body roll.

Also the Focus is quite heavy and a feature of the first generation Focuses was a tough body shell with hardly any body flex, which might still being carried forward. This was because the Focus was first designed with a Rally car in mind, and unlike Mitsubishi and Subaru, they are still a force to be reckoned with in Rallying.

mate crosswind is the person who posted not me

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mate crosswind is the person who posted not me

Though I first addressed the post to you buy mistake, but the time you replied it was already corrected ;) Note your own quote above.

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Though I first addressed the post to you buy mistake, but the time you replied it was already corrected ;) Note your own quote above.

ah dammit.. im too slow :D

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Crosswind, I think the Focuses in Europe also has fairly stiff suspension. It is not really a feature of the "rough roads package" but an attempt by Ford to give a good drive and stability with little body roll.

Also the Focus is quite heavy and a feature of the first generation Focuses was a tough body shell with hardly any body flex, which might still being carried forward. This was because the Focus was first designed with a Rally car in mind, and unlike Mitsubishi and Subaru, they are still a force to be reckoned with in Rallying.

Thanks for the correction (post corrected). I don't have any hands-on experience on European market Foci. I did drive a Mondeo, which I thought was the closest comparison but on hindsight, it's probably not.

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Ford Etis

One of the most important tools a Ford owner can have is the access to the Ford ETIS system. This is not just for Focus owners but for any Ford owner (barring Mazda Fords perhaps). ETIS is an online system that provides important information for the car owner (or a potential buyer) and service personnel.

Link for ETIS is http://www.etis.ford.com/

All you need is the VIN of the car to access the ETIS system.

Information you can get from the ETIS system are:

  • Exact build date of the car (Day, month and year)
  • Plant where the car was built
  • Mechanical information such as engine, transmission, suspension and more
  • All the options the car was shipped with
  • Market which it was intended to be
  • For a Ranger owner, it will also give you the mounting guide for canopies
  • Any product recalls that are in affect
  • Parts catalogue

You can also generate a service schedule and emergency rescue cards (showing the critical points of the car such as fuel tank, airbag sensor, fuel path etc.)

If you register yourself as an independent service provider (garage), which is free to do, you can get access to a few more free resources (for example, a service checklist specific to the car) or get paid access, if you need specific information such as wiring diagrams.

Below are screenshot of Ford ETIS page specific to my car and a Ford recommended service checklist for the service at 200000km or 120 Months.

28u1c9i.jpg

15i2ck4.jpg

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The focus has mechanical power steering? My dad got the fiesta and im quite sure it has one of the new electric power steering systems. Its just very lite and gets stiffer as the speed increases. Much better than the electro-hydrolic PS system on my 307. Reason we didnt get the Focus is because the sales rep promised the 1.4L unit on the fiesta will bring better mileage (12 in city limites). It barely does 9 in the city. Some guy named curt as i remember. I dont think there is a marginal difference from the 1.4L and the 1.6L.

Anyway great cars for the price you pay. Very confortable , Nice to look at, Standing out from the crowd. It's no Mercedes but IMHO miles ahead from the competitive Jap models.

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Sorry Don but the focus was designed as a normal car first then modified for use in rallying. (They actually built a few 4x4 focus's and puma's then compared the 2)

The road going car shares very little in design with its rallying brother other than the basic body shape.

The stiffer ride and lack of body flex is due to rear beam suspension and many models have a hidden front upper strut brace.

Crosswind - the duratec engine should never be noisy.....if your is there is a problem.

To be honest running only 95 is pushing it in my opinion....use 98 if you can get it, ecu will run the faster ignition map and your fuel consumption will decrease and the get up and go will increase.

I would service the car more often than the dealer tells you, yous only Motorcraft oil filters, and castrol 5w30 oil.

Change your fuel and air filter regularly.

If you get stuck with a problem drop me a pm....I work part time for these guys in Australia www.rsshop.com.au

All I ever do is work on cosworths and the RS focus And the rest of the time I work in a land rover and ford main dealer ;)

ps another known problem with the focus is the washer jet seals leak water into the spark plug cover. If you get rough running and a misfire check there first!

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My apologies for the delayed response gentlemen.

The focus has mechanical power steering? My dad got the fiesta and im quite sure it has one of the new electric power steering systems. Its just very lite and gets stiffer as the speed increases. Much better than the electro-hydrolic PS system on my 307. Reason we didnt get the Focus is because the sales rep promised the 1.4L unit on the fiesta will bring better mileage (12 in city limites). It barely does 9 in the city. Some guy named curt as i remember. I dont think there is a marginal difference from the 1.4L and the 1.6L.

Anyway great cars for the price you pay. Very confortable , Nice to look at, Standing out from the crowd. It's no Mercedes but IMHO miles ahead from the competitive Jap models.

The Focus has hydraulic power steering (that's what I actually meant by 'mechanical'). Yup, Fiesta has EPS. The reason is because the Fiesta that was sold at that time was one generation ahead of the Focus. Dunno if the 3rd Gen Focus has EPS.

Fiesta hatchback is gorgeous. For me, the sedan resembles the fugly Suzuki Swift Dzire car. Hence, it's a big no-no.

Oh yeah... Kurt... don't wanna talk about him.

Sorry Don but the focus was designed as a normal car first then modified for use in rallying. (They actually built a few 4x4 focus's and puma's then compared the 2) The road going car shares very little in design with its rallying brother other than the basic body shape. The stiffer ride and lack of body flex is due to rear beam suspension and many models have a hidden front upper strut brace. Crosswind - the duratec engine should never be noisy.....if your is there is a problem. To be honest running only 95 is pushing it in my opinion....use 98 if you can get it, ecu will run the faster ignition map and your fuel consumption will decrease and the get up and go will increase. I would service the car more often than the dealer tells you, yous only Motorcraft oil filters, and castrol 5w30 oil. Change your fuel and air filter regularly. If you get stuck with a problem drop me a pm....I work part time for these guys in Australia www.rsshop.com.au All I ever do is work on cosworths and the RS focus And the rest of the time I work in a land rover and ford main dealer ;) ps another known problem with the focus is the washer jet seals leak water into the spark plug cover. If you get rough running and a misfire check there first!

Cheers mate. But are you sure you are talking about the European version of Focus and not the American or Aussie version? For one thing, all the literature recommends Octane 95.

Also this is the second Duratec which I have used and both were noisy. What do you reckon?

Thanks for the heads up on the water leakage issue. Whats the solution for that mate? Original post updated.

Edited by Crosswind

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It's been a while since I updated this thread. Managed to get hold of a service schedule for the Focus (2011 and thereafter) models in Sri Lanka. Posting it for future reference with comparable Japanese part numbers (wherever possible)...

CORRECTION TO THIS POST: The correct part number for spark plugs is Ford: AYFS22CB NGK: TR5B-13 Bosch: HR8MEV or HR8MCV+, Nippondenso: ITV-16

3Vy4zMa.gif

Edited by Crosswind

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Great info.I've forwaded this to 2 friends who are contemplating going for a focus...Any views regarding the local agents?

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Great info.I've forwaded this to 2 friends who are contemplating going for a focus...Any views regarding the local agents?

Yes there are lot of views regarding the agents. But let me put it this way, they can be tamed and house trained with minimal effort, unlike agents of other marques :)

Ill post the 100000-200000km service schedule (which is more or less a replica of the above) when I get time to compile it.

Edited by Crosswind

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Just an update to the thread.

2.5 years and 25000km later:

Issues faced:

Suffered from flat battery syndrome, which is a known issue with OEM batteries that come with European Fords. With absolutely no warning, the battery will decide to die. Luckily mine died within the warranty period (the three-year warranty covers batteries as well). The agent replaced it under warranty.

Apart from that, there has been no other mechanical issues with the car. Fuel consumption remains virtually the same (9km/litre). No noises, misfires and no signs of interior deterioration (note that we are talking about a European car not a Jap).

Maintenance work done:

Changed the battery (under warranty)

Changed tyres

Changed brake pads as a precautionary measure

I did some research on batteries and found that unfortunately most of the car batteries available in the local market cannot be fitted for the Focus. The only battery which I found that will fit the car is Amaron Pro MF

The reason is, the battery located in a compartment close to the firewall (close to the dashboard)

voqryx.jpg

The battery compartment is not tall enough to fit most of the batteries in the local market

aa1kh.jpg

Finally, with the Amaron Pro MF battery fitted in:

2vwhc91.jpg

Brembo Brake pads from a UK authorized dealer on eBay

2rcyh3b.jpg

242ifki.jpg

Out with the old tyres

mvhu3d.jpg

In with the new

14cr28z.jpg

2em3dyx.jpg

Why this funny Chinese brand tyre, one may ask... The reason is my car is one of the cars that came with 205/50-R17 tyres. Most Focuses came to Sri Lanka with 16-inch tyres. 205/50-R17 is a rare size in Sri Lanka and only Dunlop, Kinforest and Falken is available so far. Kinforest cost only 13700 each where as one Dunlop would cost 3 times as much. Initially I changed two front tyres to check if they handle ok in wet conditions. While these are not spectacular, they perform alright. Less noiser and give better accelration than stock Continental tyres that came with the car. But they don't handle that well like Continentals.

Edited by Crosswind

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Ford Focus Self-Diagnostic

One of the lesser known features of the Focus, is its self-diagnostic testing ability. A user can do a few tests on their own to determine any issues. I understand that most of the Fords carry the same tests and probably most of the Euros also have similar features.

I can’t take credit to discovering any of these. Most of this knowledge comes from Ford Forums on the Internet. But I have verified that this will work with Foci imported to Sri Lanka.

In the Sri Lankan context, following would be the most important tests.

Gauge Sweep – check if all gauges are working

Alarm check – Check If all (sound alarms) are working

LED Check – Check if all LEDs are working. As time goes by and these cars get in to the hands of resellers, chances are that some of the LEDs may be rewired to prevent trouble indicators from getting displayed. If one is buying a second hand Focus, this will be a useful test.

ODO Rollback count – Shows whether the odometer is rolled back. Again, very useful if one is buying a second hand Focus. If the Japanese were at least a little bit thoughtful on this one, then half the car salesmen in Sri Lanka will be out of business!

Diagnostic Trouble Codes – Shows whether the car’s diagnostic system has recorded any trouble codes. This is usually a paid service at garages. Self-diagnostic and Google makes life much easier for Focus owners.

Battery Voltage – shows the current battery voltage. User can check if the battery is properly functional on their own, instead of relying on con-men at battery shops.

Engine Temperature – Feel that the engine is running too warm? Just check the exact temperature!

How To:

  • Insert the key and keep it on position I on the key way
  • Press the Set/Reset button on the signal arm and hold it
  • Turn the key to position III (ignition) but don’t start the car. If you have the lights, radio and A/C on, you can turn them off to prevent draining the battery.
  • Hold the Set/Reset button for 10 seconds or until the display shows TEST
  • All tests will happen in sequence and all you need to do, is to keep pressing the Set/Reset button to traverse through tests
  • Once the tests are done, switch off the car (move the key back to position I) to finish the tests.
35a6stf.jpg

This works flawlessly. Thanks for sharing. I really like the digital speedometer.

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When I was reading that tires were changed at 25k kms I was bit surprised cuz usually we change tires around 35 to 40k kms (provided enough thread remains for safety diriving). I changed my 4 Yokohama tires after 40k. Did continentals gave up quickly or any other particular reason for the tire change?

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Good question. If you look at the old tyre, you would notice that the tread was alright and probably could last another 10K or so. But the sidewall of the two passenger side tyres got scraped to the pavement a few times and I noticed a deterioration on the sidewall. Didn't want to risk a blowout at less than manageable speed.

I hated those tyres from Day 1 anyway so I was glad to shove them off. Bloody noisy tyres.


Having said that, German made Continental tyres aren't that great with Sri Lankan weather. They deteriorate far too quickly. I have noticed the same with tyres that come with Mercs as well.

Edited by Crosswind

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@ crosswind

I second that. Had the same deterioration issue with the Continentals on my GP, and had to discard them with some tread still on.

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Hi Crosswind,


One of my friends is in search for a new car and asked for some help on his selection. According to his budget and other preferences, Ford focus seems to be a good option. So, how do you feel about the car after owning it for nearly four years now?

is there anything else we need to keep an eye on apart from the things mentioned in this thread?

Have you come across any new issues lately?

thought of asking since you haven't updated the thread for sometime now.. :-)


Cheers !!

Edited by LashNeo

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