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JadeyBlitzen

Motion Blur Shots

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Hi guys!

Have any of you taken any motion blur pics? as a kid I was mesmerized by all those cool blurry pics of cars in action in car magazines. I've tried it here and there with my run of the mill panasonic fx-35. here are some pics I took in February last year that I completely forgot about.

apologies for the skakey pics cos I just held the camera with my hands.

post any professional shots you guys have taken

19739_329922861258_504486258_5186926_7112975_n.jpg

19739_329922841258_504486258_5186924_4913298_n.jpg

19939_336445011258_504486258_5211748_2995586_n.jpg

19939_336445061258_504486258_5211753_2929320_n.jpg

19939_336445051258_504486258_5211752_2355783_n.jpg

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hey dude,

Motion blur photos refer to photos in sports photography where a car or sportsman might be moving fast and then car itself is sharp and in focus whereas the rest of the background seems like its flashing past..

The photos you've posted are long exposures. (technically a motion blur is a slightly long exposure too) But the difference is that in a motion blur the camera follows the object whereas the in the ones you've mentioned the camera is stationary as the subject moves

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Basic motion blur can be achieved on any camera by adjusting your shutter speed. Try it on your digicam in manual mode.

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hey dude,

Motion blur photos refer to photos in sports photography where a car or sportsman might be moving fast and then car itself is sharp and in focus whereas the rest of the background seems like its flashing past..

The photos you've posted are long exposures. (technically a motion blur is a slightly long exposure too) But the difference is that in a motion blur the camera follows the object whereas the in the ones you've mentioned the camera is stationary as the subject moves

Thankx for the info :)

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hey dude,

Motion blur photos refer to photos in sports photography where a car or sportsman might be moving fast and then car itself is sharp and in focus whereas the rest of the background seems like its flashing past..

The photos you've posted are long exposures. (technically a motion blur is a slightly long exposure too) But the difference is that in a motion blur the camera follows the object whereas the in the ones you've mentioned the camera is stationary as the subject moves

oh! I thought motion blur refers to all pictures in which a subject is captured while the background or other objects in the frame are moving regardless of whether the camera is stationary or not. Thanks for clearing that out :)

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oh! I thought motion blur refers to all pictures in which a subject is captured while the background or other objects in the frame are moving regardless of whether the camera is stationary or not. Thanks for clearing that out :)

Reading what I'd typed I dont think i was very clear either.

Why dont we let wiki do what it does best.. Motion Blur. Accordingly to it I was wrong. The 'Light trails' (as overdrive explained) also fall under motion blur.

Applications of motion blur- Photography

250px-London_bus_and_telephone_box_on_Haymarket.jpg

When a camera creates an image, that image does not always represent a single instant of time. Because of technological constraints or artistic requirements, the image may represent the scene over a period of time. As objects in a scene move, an image of that scene must represent anintegration of all positions of those objects, as well as the camera's viewpoint, over the period of exposure determined by the shutter speed. In such an image, any object moving with respect to the camera will look blurred or smeared along the direction of relative motion. This smearing may occur on an object that is moving or on a static background if the camera is moving. In a film or television image, this looks natural because the human eye behaves in much the same way.

Because the effect is caused by the relative motion between the camera, and the objects and scene, motion blur may be avoided by panning the camera to track those moving objects. In this case, even with long exposure times, the objects will appear sharper, and the background more blurred.

Edited by Watchman

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19739_329922861258_504486258_5186926_7112975_n.jpg

where is the place this picture taken mate it seems familiar to me.

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dsc0327wz.jpg

Nikon D3100

f/8, ISO 200, 10 sec

dsc0328m.jpg

f/29, ISO 100, 15 sec

Edited by NPP

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Yikes NPP! Why f29??

shutter priority :)

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there's a few of these in the current edition of motor mag, taken in daylight, with the car in focus and the surrounding blurred.

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I need to get myself a tripod :sad-smiley-067:

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I need to get myself a tripod :sad-smiley-067:

If you're planning on doing motion blur photos in motorsports you dont need a tripod, not can you use one. Peri's photo above was hand held too.

The reason is that the tripod wont let you follow the car in its actual direction.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dileshw/3954989080/in/set-72157622331602185

In something like this the road curves so you have to follow the car accordingly.

Or if you want to tilt your camera a bit for a more dynamic feel its always easier to have the camera hand held.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dileshw/3954208101/in/set-72157622331602185

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If you're planning on doing motion blur photos in motorsports you dont need a tripod, not can you use one. Peri's photo above was hand held too.

The reason is that the tripod wont let you follow the car in its actual direction.

http://www.flickr.co...157622331602185

In something like this the road curves so you have to follow the car accordingly.

Or if you want to tilt your camera a bit for a more dynamic feel its always easier to have the camera hand held.

http://www.flickr.co...157622331602185

No no, I know that machan :) But thanks for the tips & great shots btw. I just needed to get a tripod anyway & just wanted to say it out loud :)

Thinking of this

http://www.amazon.com/Dolica-GX600B200-Proline-60-Inch-Aluminum/dp/B004XC3GWU/ref=sr_1_35?s=photo&ie=UTF8&qid=1323744137&sr=1-35

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True, tripods are singularly useless in this kind of stuff. A monopod is slightly more useful, but still not great. If you want support, the only thing you can really use is a car rig :)

http://diyphotograph...ialized-car-rig

And I am waaay to lazy to go thru all that trouble unless there is some good money being offered.

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No no, I know that machan :) But thanks for the tips & great shots btw. I just needed to get a tripod anyway & just wanted to say it out loud :)

Thinking of this

http://www.amazon.co...3744137&sr=1-35

Looks good. Personally, I'd go for the 65inch. I'd prefer a 68" or 70" but whatever is the max.

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You'd need a tripod (and maybe a remote shutter release) if you're doing light trails (traffic/stars etc).

Handheld panning works best for motorsports - hopefully the light would be enough at the night races to get some panned shots!

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Tripods, monopods actually get in the way of doing panning shots. best is to practice your skills. Canon L series lenses have special stabilization for panning movements. Having IS anyways is plus and having this panning stabilization is a huge plus. But nothing beats experience imho.

On the races...saw some lights being hooked up in certain places along the track. No idea how it will look after dark though. And if you're located in fast stretches, available light might not be enough.

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Tripods, monopods actually get in the way of doing panning shots. best is to practice your skills. Canon L series lenses have special stabilization for panning movements. Having IS anyways is plus and having this panning stabilization is a huge plus. But nothing beats experience imho.

Hmmm.... gonna have to try that IS Mode 2 ;)

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Hmmm.... gonna have to try that IS Mode 2 ;)

For Nikon VR , it's the Active mode. However, having tried both IS 2 and VR Active for panning - must say IS 2 was the better by far.

Still gonna stick to Nikon though, at least the lens was twice as cheap :P

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For Nikon VR , it's the Active mode. However, having tried both IS 2 and VR Active for panning - must say IS 2 was the better by far.

Still gonna stick to Nikon though, at least the lens was twice as cheap :P

I used to use a Nikon 55-250mmVR and the VR on that wasnt that good... when at the races I used to turn it off. And if we're talking of photographing at a proximity of 10-12 meters away like at the colombo road race you're better of turning off the auto-focus too. pre-focus and capture at that right point. Some lenses just arent fast enough in auto focusing.

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