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  1. 8 points
    Its like taking a grandma to midn*ght [email protected]
  2. 7 points
    Toyota Gorilla Ashkio 141 japan modal (not thaiwan) ,Bajj intariyal ,winkel miraar, pul opshan, baket shit, lady doktar owning, ganuin milaj 69,000 km. Hand 10,00,000 /- pinans 53,000 *48, Susuki avery badi van sexchange conisadared.
  3. 2 points
    Bodywork started after disassembling almost all parts. Remain only the outer shell of the car with wiring harness which can not pullout easily. Gauge 14 & 18 zinc coated metal sheets used for most places. Firstly cut the right side of the chassis and welded new bar. Then the left side and floor board plates one by one. All door bottoms, front and back wings repaired. Mean time door hinge pins refilled at a lathe workshop. Finally attached all doors and wings again to check the aligning. Carbide 9kg and a oxygen cylinder consumed for this works.
  4. 2 points
    Should have told them that it's the factory position and Googled images of Evo Xs to prove your point. 😋
  5. 2 points
    Well as mentioned by sadik above two different types of car - with the only common factor being the price. I assume you are referring to the 1st Generation of both cars XP40 (the XP90 actually resembles the Yaris/Belta) for the Vios and XP60 for the IST. It depends on whether you're looking at a sedan or a hatch. While IST's did come with the 1.5 L 1NZ and the Vios did have the 1.3 L 2NZ for the majority of cars in SL the IST had 1.3 and Vios 1.5.. the vios was a tough and reliable workhorse but now after 15 years of abuse it's a little difficult to find a non-hacked specimen out there. Some of the IsT's though have aged a little more gracefully specially the interior bits and pieces are still holding up compared to a majority of the vios's where they have started to show their age. But this does not mean there are gems:I have an uncle running a 2004 vios with KI plates for the last 12 years still in absolute mint condition.
  6. 2 points
    Well - For starters Vios is a sedan and IST is a hatch. Vios is Thailand / Indonesia built (like the Avanza) vs IST was Japanese made. Both cars are plenty used in SL , and both lines if i am not mistaken have been discontinued. Vios now goes at Ativa i think and am not sure which replaced IST. Personal experience , i preferred the IST to the Vios despite the space handicap. But mind you IST was 1.3 ( there were a few 1.5s) whilst Vios is 1.5. I can remember the i.3 IST did better fuel vs the Vios, and creature comforts IST was much better. In fact in the West the IST was sold as one of the iconic "Scion" brand name dubbed "Urban cruiser". The last IST model was quite the looker for me. The last Vios model was based on the Yaris / Belta in fact , despite a few cosmetic changes it was hard to dis-certain one from the other. I think the Vios had more bling like a nickel shell and slighly modified headlights + better kit. But you dont get many examples in SL and i think many were imported for Airforce +Navy usage. The experts must correct me but both cars had the 1NZ engine, although not sure about the gearbox for Vios. Don't know about the latest Vios , but the one before which was very popular in SL wasnt very comfy for me and had noisy suspension. Dont know whether it was a build quality problem / the example which i used was maintained bad. On the contrary the IST faced road abuse much better, being the more silent and smoother ride. IST was more responsive , fun to drive and also looked better vs the Vios. But i think Vios had more pick up. IST had a few grades, where you got some very good kit for the car. (F, FL so on). Personally if you ask me i would prefer the IST , against the Vios , during the whole usage experience of mine.
  7. 2 points
    I would say you should stick to the EK and fix and do some sensible modifications to it. A decent EK2 is pretty rare in SL and many enthusiasts will drool over it till the end of their days. Even if you sell the EK and try to buy another car, your choices are limited (especially in finding something that feels better). Also, you have no idea what the condition of the new car would be....
  8. 2 points
    Yes it's a basic A-B car. Performance is non existent. You have to really step on the gas at times to get to a decent speed. Going on all roads does not necessarily demand performance. Recently got down a 2016 Safety unit for an uncle of mine as a personal import- genuine mileage little less than 30k. It gets him from A-B and that's it. He however made the observation that it was vibrating a lot - an observation tiv had also made.
  9. 2 points
    This reminds me of a mechanic who said about Isuzu ගාමිණී (where he was referring to Isuzu Gemini) regards, JC
  10. 1 point
    Would a newer petrol prado 2.7l TRJ150 be a wise swap to a 3.2 diesel Montero 2013 v98, can it be called an upgrade?
  11. 1 point
    Not sure what the regulation in SL is as everything is as most things are in a grey area over here. In most countries the requirement is to have it in the middle with the exception of cases where it is placed on the side by manufacturer design (for example if placing it in the side is required for safety or performance reasons). So in most countries painting the number plate on the side of the bumper of riverting one on the side is not acceptable. It needs to be relocated properly and one needs to have justification (such as installing an extra radiator/cooler which should pass technical inspection) to do so
  12. 1 point
    I don't get this....most of the crossovers get 6-8kmpl in the city..which is not that much lower and even the same as most of the sedans around so it is not that more expensive than a sedan (granted the subsidized price of diesel and an old diesel getting lets say 10 ? in the city would provide per tank wallet-friendliness). Been using CRVs and RAV4s in SL for ages and it has not cost that much more nor less than the sedans the company has. You really don't have to rev that high....most of the power comes in at about 3500revs and most of the torque comes in at about the same point in most of these crossovers, the former of course does help in SL driving. The diesels of course gets most of the torque around half those revs whilst the max power will be reached around the same as the crossover. So yeah..it is not about power but torque in these situation. Also, with the CVTs, when driving on the highway these things settle down at a rather low rev range. The issue is going to be finding a good example of these old diesels...people do not want to get rid of good ones and when they do it is typically on the higher end of the price spectrum. So, the bottom line is, considering what the vehicle is going to be used for and how often; the question that the OP needs to ask himself is if the requirements for an old diesel really justifiable when considering the long term total cost of ownership (so you would need to balance out costs of maintenance of high mileage diesels vs a mid mileage petrol...). Also, if you are looking for a easier car to drive around town for your parents...then some of those crossovers are easier for them. If you think that was bad....you should try the new one in pure petrol form To be honest I don't think the 2L was bad in the T30...what let it down was a twitchy gearbox which was not geared to handle a heavy, boxy body. So driving around town was not the easiest. The CRV and RAV4 of the time were similarly powered the 2L variants). The RAV4 had a slight weight advantage and the CR-V had a pretty sweet engine and a good gearbox (although the weird hill climbing thingy was a bit of an annoyance).
  13. 1 point
    Peugeot 407 Peugeot 508 Peugeot 3008
  14. 1 point
    The 5L version Prado wasn't offered in Japan as it was designed for the developing markets. It was meant to be a low maintenance, cheap to run Prado and if i'm not wrong it came with lesser features as well. Which version of Prado do you have? Is it the KDJ150? Some people advice not to tune/remap ECU of vehicles with 1KD due to some reason relating to the injectors but one of my friend got a remap done for Hiace and so far it's fine
  15. 1 point
    If you are considering the J90 series Land Cruiser Prado, make sure you find one thats well looked after. The 1KZ engine found in it produces decent power and it sounds lovely but it could become a complete nightmare if not looked after properly. There are few 90 series LC Prado in SL with the 1KD engine as well, they pack more power but the earlier versions of 1KD engines are known to give injector trouble. It was also offered with the 5L engine, these are cheap to run and maintain but these were bit under-powered.
  16. 1 point
    Hi so, about the Mitsubishi’s, personally the above vehicles are really good, but would defeat your purpose on being a reliable tourer, see the montero sport, it’s not going to happen around 6mil, if there are cars, they’d be badly hacked or mileage turned, they take 200,000 plus cars and make em 100,000 and sell em, so if you buy one you ll have work, most of the true mileage ones are above 7mil , and owners are less likely to part with them cheap. Agent mileage records can also be cheated if you know the right people. and an older montero, same story, lot of pending work. Mostly . It’s not going to be cheap For both these either, the montero sport has very little aftermarket / recon parts so it’s mostly agent montero bits are by the hundreds but not cheap either So you ll be hunting for parts and doing repairs rather than going on this tour, I’d suggest something newer, cheaper and smaller, so you’ll have money to play around with, Incase something goes south. And something that will hold value
  17. 1 point
    Aha....I was not paying attention to the details...I thought he was talking about the following when he mentioned 70 Land Cruiser Okay..so if he is talking about the 90 series LC Prado then yes..not many body swaps (that I know of). The Land Cruiser...basically you had the old school 40 series which was the military Jeep style workhorse. During that time Toyota also launched a passenger oriented variant which was the Land Cruiser wagon (the J55/5x) to compete with the Nissan Safari which was more passenger friendly. The wagon variant went on to become the J60,J80,J100,J200 series Land Cruisers (which we now call the Sahara, etc...). The J40 in the early 80s was replaced with the J70 series Land Cruiser which again was workhorse type jeep. Although a workhorse many people (at least in Japan) were buying it for passenger use as well as commercial use (dual purpose) because it was reasonably priced (compared to the more luxurious J60 and J80 series station wagons of the time). Needless to say the J70 was a bit too harsh for Japanese roads and with changing regulations for passenger vehicles and the release of the Mitsubishi Pajero (which was as capable as a LC J70 more passenger friendlier than the J70 but nimbler and cheaper than the J60/80) Toyota decided to release a "station wagon" variant of the J70which was workhorsish but also had some creature comforts and somewhat softened up to suit city use. This was called the Land Cruiser II (came in 3 and 5 door variants) and was sold in Japan and some other export markets....later on the LC 70 station wagon (now called the Land Cruiser II) was called Land Cruiser Prado in some regions including Japan. As time went by The Land Cruiser Prado became its own little lineup just like the full sized station wagons (J80,100,200). It was placed right in the middle; not as plump and luxurious as the full sized wagon and not as bare-bone and harsh as the J70 jeeps. Thus, overtime we got the J90, J120 and J150 series LC Prados. During this time the J40 replacement, the J70 still continued production to this day in various forms (2-door, troop carrier, truck, double cab). What is interesting is although Toyota introduced the Prado with the hope of replacing the J70 5-door station wagon, there still was a demand for the J70 5-door series wagonvariant. So Toyota keeps on making those as well till this day. So that is the whole LC story in a moderately long paragraph...there are quite a lot of things missing...but I believe it gives the general idea.
  18. 1 point
    I've been on one - has a bit of a lorry vibe to it not uncomfortable per se. Looks tough don't think you can buy one for 6.5 tho. irage, The land cruiser nomenclature [at least locally] has always been confusing to me - there's the 70 series and then the 80'series and then there are export models, jdm models, sahara's and so on and on. I think OP is after the 90 series because he mentions 65 or early english numbers- I have not seen 70 series come with 65 plates or early english numbers. Since these were not military models maybe there are lesser cut and buds on this? No idea though. Tagging @tiv here to get some more info about the monteros.
  19. 1 point
    Yes....I know myself who is married to a Japanese Yes...the spouse has to renew visa every few years...2,3,5,etc.... That is pretty normal in most countries...I have to renew my spouse status residency every few years in Japan. the difference in other countries is that in other countries after X number of years the spouse is eligible to apply for permanent residency and subsequently nationality. In Sri Lanka that seems to be questionable. Even after decades the foreign spouse may not be granted PR (or nationality) and has to keep on renewing the spouse visa. In the mean time if the Sri Lankan spouse passes away then the foreign spouse faces a whole lot of issues in renewing visa and there are quite a few I know who are living in uncertainty. What happens with the property is a whole different story but seems to be changing (slowly) and becoming more flexible with time..mainly because Sri Lankan expats investing in property in SL. Getting it...well..getting it was not difficult for us. There were some requirements of having to be in SL for 6 months before applying, etc..or some ridiculous thing like that...so wife had to apply for a normal visa for 3 months or something in Japan to come here, then start the application for spouse visa whilst extending her 3 month visa for another 3 months. They just gave both the visa extension an the souse visa or for free (back then) and the people at the immigration office were quite helpful and courteous (in fact they helped us save money we tried to apply for the extension and then apply for the spouse visa later...but they forced us to apply for spouse visa because then we get the extension for free) . During that time an immigration Police officer visited me and my life at separate occasions and asked some questions. The giy was a plain clothes officer who looked like a vagabond and totally freaked out my wife. When we applied my wife and I had been married for 4 years and had a kid so it was pretty straight forward..they just gave it. If a couple is newly married we were told that it is a bit more difficult (longer probation periods, more interviews, etc...), especially if the husband and wife do not have significant assets or something like a kid. The spouse's Nationality and Gender seems to play a bit of factor. At the time we applied they were strict with Chinese women who were getting in to fake marriages....If the spouse is a male, then it is harder as well because the male is considered to be the main bread-winner and because the foreign-spouse cannot be employed questions of income gets raised. The spouse visa in Sri Lanka is quite restrictive...on one hand there is this huge grey area about property ownership and subsequent transfer. The foreign spouse cannot get employed. However, the person can engage in a "home business" or be self employed. Foreign spouse is not entitled to any free national healthcare, voting, etc...However, the only one time I had to take my wife to a national hospital the doctor and the nurse just said it was FoC.
  20. 1 point
    Seems you are reading more adds on that quick site everyday.
  21. 1 point
    I don't know if you are being sarcastic or being completely oblivious. 1. Price conscious motoring....does not mean using a tuk tuk or uber....by this statement you are also implying that people in SL buy cars for wanting to be exorbitant. Also...cars like the Axio, Prius are not pricey cars...they are pricey in Sri Lanka because of stupid policies. You seem to be missing that when comparing Mercs and Toyotas.... 2. The ICE Civic is a ICE ! Pure Gasoline engine....why on earth would a sane person compare that with a Hybrid ? It is also obvious that you are oblivious to developments that are happening with model changes. The Civic (which is a pure gasoline only model) went turbo charged with the change of model. The Corolla with the change of model is also going turbocharged with its pure gasoline engines and Hybrid line up will be separate. This seems to be the general strategy for Toyota (and even Nissan and Honda) when and where feasible, some markets will still have the large capacity pure gasoline engine purely for maintainability sake. Most of Toyota's turbo know-how had been improved through the BMW and Subaru partnerships....and the other's Hybrid tech has been improved via Toyota's Hybrid know-how. So it goes both ways (if you had read any of my previous posts you would know that Toyota's HSD patents are free for use) 3. It is not a matter of holding out. Holding out serves no purpose to anyone..including themselves...them holding out and then putting out old technology is not going to make them any more richer. The Japanese have always been conservative when it comes to rolling out automotive tech. They have always been so and always will be. They play a long R&D game along with waiting and watching what happens to others and their tech...The classic statement "The US/West will invent it, Japanese will improve it and Chinese will mass produce it cheaply" still holds.
  22. 1 point
    That's because of the typical Sri Lankan mentalityIMO! We do not know how to let things go when the time comes but choose to cling on to whatever unnecessary things for trivial reasons. In the end, we do not enjoy, nor are content with whatever we have now but instead keep on worrying about what we might lose in future.
  23. 1 point
    Ah! You snuck in a picture of your new girlfriend huh? Well: Congrats man! All the best to both of you....
  24. 1 point
    Storing a car: 1. Clean the garage where the car is stored. If possible, remove all cans, bottles, junk, paper etc out of it. Sweep the floor. This is to get rid of rats, which may have already settled in your garage and to get rid of the dust and dirt. Never park the car outside, unless you have absolutely no choice. 2. Wash and vaccum the car once. This will remove dirt like crow droppings, which may damage the paint if it stays on the body for too long. Vaccuming will remove any dirt in the car, particularly food particles such as 'kadala', which may start smelling and attract insects. It will be a good idea to wax it too. 3. Get a trickle charger and connect to the battery. If its an old car (without an ECU), you don't need to do this. You can just disconnect the battery terminals. If you can't do this, make sure the battery is fully charged and its good enough to hold a charge. 4. Some websites will tell you to fill up on petrol. Don't do this. Petrol in Sri Lanka already contains water and chances are that water will vaporize. Also if the car is left in storage for long, fuel rails may get corroded due to the water in petrol. 5. If possible, remove the tires and place the car on jack-stands. If a tire loses all air in it, it might become permanently damaged. You may have to replace the tire(s). This will also remove the strain on the suspension. However, if you are storing the car for just a month or two, you don't need to do this. 6. Keep the handbrake OFF. If you keep it on, you will definitely get a brake bind. Place bricks behind the tires (if you didn't remove them) to prevent the car from moving. 7. Block the air inlet and exhaust pipe. This will prevent rats going in to the car. 8. For a relatively old car, apply some lithium grease (not petroleum grease) on door hinges and similar mechanisms. This is also optional. You don't need to do most of these things if you can start and move the car for a short distance, at least once a week. When starting a car after storage: 1. Give a good look at the surroundings of the car. Check if birds haven't made nests and cats haven't give birth on the wheel wells, under the engine or inside the rims. 2. Open the bonnet and check for evidence of rats. Look for droppings, chewed belts, signs of shavings of plastic. Check the air filter for any damage. 3. If you covered the air intake and exhaust pipe, make sure these are removed. 4. Check the fluid levels - engine oil, gear oil, brake oil, water. Peek under the car to see if you can spot any oil leaks. 5. Check the battery voltage and tire pressure 6. Start the car and run it in idle for a few minutes before moving. Check for misfires during this time. Most likely the engine will misfire due to water in petrol but hopefully it might go away after few minutes on idle.
  25. 1 point
    before i go for Honda my dream vehicle is serena. But with the same stories that everyone tells about serena thought of not to go for it. But still i like that model.
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