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  1. 20 points
    Here's a write up on my Daily Driver - the new Civic 1 Litre Turbo - I've so far done just a bit over 1500 Km's and since the engine was new didn't really push it to the max and I have not yet been able to do a really long trip or a drive uphill to BUT I will continue to update the blog based on the experiences as well as services etc. For a start I will touch the basics as well as all the cosmetic stuff and then get into the overall driving experience and later on the services etc. There is also a dedicated thread in the forum that is quite informative. But I hope this blog will also prove useful to someone. First of all the basics.... In a nutshell the 2017 Civic is the 10th generation in the line up. The particular model I have, and is getting popular in SL goes under the model code FK6 and has a P10A2 engine which has a measly 988cc but is turbocharged. The car is made in the UK (at Honda's Swindon Plant). I have heard that the agents now bring it down as well. (6.2M for the SR) There are 3 grades for the 1L turbocharged civic. SE, SR and the EX. The SE is the most basic model with the EX being the highest (the Tech pack is a further extension of the EX) There is roughly a 5,000 GBP (~ 1 Mil LKR) price difference between the SE and the EX. The SR on the other hand sits comfortably in the middle - it does not have stuff like adaptive damper system that comes on the EX. The Honda UK website lists down the differences of each grade under a section called 'Build your Honda' or something. If you're interested do have a look. There are 7 colors available and the Rallye Red is the standard . Every other color will cost around 500 GBP more . There is also the "Orange Line Pack" - which is basically an accessory kit that adds a touch of orange into everything - I've seen a few such cars in car sales in SL. Though I initially contemplated Sonic Grey, ended up with a Polished Metal Metallic specimen. With the 2017 Budget a new tax structure was introduced and under the engine capacity based taxation you'd be paying 17.5 m in taxes (1,754,976 LKR to be precise) for a brand new car with reasonable creature comforts and a bunch of bells and whistles which costs something between 4-5 mill based on the grade ( see above ) First Impressions For me the new Civic hatch looks like someone started designing and spent too much time doing a good job with the front and then ran out of time to design the posterior and hastily put an end to it. This explains the rather weird looking behind. The Sedan version I have to admit looks better. There's also waay too much plastic in the rear so much so that it looks like a joint venture between Honda and Arpico. There's a bit of aggressive styling at the front. The car is quite wide and it has a solid ground hugging look to it. As for the supposed vents you see at the front and the back - well those are fake. They're simply pieces of plastic made to look like vents. And yes it does have fog lights. I like the factory fitted black 17" alloys. Note the SE comes with 16" Alloys as opposed to the 17" found in the SR. Being a brand new car it came with a humongous bible-like user manual (thankfully in English) - along with the wheel lock nut as well as the tool kit and the tire repair kit (glue and the inflator which by now we are used to) If any of you intend to buy one from a regular car sale make sure they give you your wheel lock nut.
  2. 16 points
    It's been little more than 4 years with my Hiace and it has done around 76,000kms so I thought its time I give you guys an update on it. Let me start the blog with the basics, Mine is a Toyota Hiace KDH206, this variant of Hiace is fitted with a 1KD-FTV turbo engine with an all wheel drive system. The AWD system in the KDH series is pretty much full time, it runs on all four wheels normally and if any of the wheels experience a slippage, the vehicle stops sending power to that specific wheel. There is a noticeable difference between the AWD variant(KDH206) and RWD variant(KDH201). The KDH206 is around 100kg heavier and you could feel that through the steering when you drive one. In addition, the KDH206 feels far more planted at higher speeds and around corners than the RWD variant. However the downside is that the full time AWD system drinks bit more fuel than RWD version. Cost of Maintenance In short the Hiace is not cheap run, I get fuel economy of around 6km/l in kandy and around 9-10km/l outstation, the RWD KDH201 would return around another extra 2km more per litre. Hiace is originally fitted with 195/80R15 8ply tyres and they cost around 22-23.5K per tyre from brands like Continental or Pirelli, while Maxxis tyre could be found for around 16k. The Hiace requires 0W-30 oil and a regular service which needs to be carried out every 5000km costs around 10K using Toyota oil, I was using Toyota oil filter as well, but now I have switched to VIC. ATF oil must be changed around every 40k kms, I change air filter and cabin filter every year. It requires super diesel and this is an absolute must, if you regularly pump auto diesel you will pay more in repairs than what you saved by pumping auto diesel. The most likely issues you would get from pumping auto diesel are DPF, which costs around 70-80k to replace and injectors, which would set you back around 500k for all four. So far I had to change only a bush which costed around 50rs, apart from that I have not had any repairs. Performance The Hiace pulls pretty well for a vehicle which weighs 2 tonnes, the 1KD-FTV with a variable nozzle turbo produces 100kw at 3400RPM and 300nm of torque at 1200-3200rpm and it is connected to a 4 speed conventional automatic gearbox. Overtaking other vehicles with Hiace is pretty easy, you just have to put your foot down, the turbo will come to life and you would be gone. It is always on the right gear, there's no unnecessary downshifts or up shifts, the gearing ratios are perfectly synced with the power band of the engine although it is only a 4 speed gearbox in a world of 6 and 7 speed gearboxes. The Hiace properly comes to life on hill climbs with the help of low end power and variable nozzle turbo. Handling is fairly good for a van, it handles better than large SUVs. The KDH series has much less body roll compared to the previous LH series, but it isn't great as handling of a car. I notice the difference in handling when I drive the Hiace after driving our Bluebird which has front and rear independent suspension. Comfort It doesn't handle large potholes and bumps as good as a car, but it does manage to soften small potholes pretty well. The diesel engine noise is evident compared to a hybrid or petrol vehicle but the noise reduces when the vehicle gets to the third gear or at around 70+ km/h speed. The A/C is epic on the Hiace, it is one of the best cooling A/C I have come across, I rarely have to set the A/C temperature below 26 degree Celsius on auto mode and that is without the dual A/C. There is plenty of space inside, 7 or 8 people could travel on long journeys with their legs stretched out and not crammed. The second row seat is the best place to be in, you get the dual A/C right in front of you, it is acoustic sweet spot and minimal sunlight enters the cabin. Practicality It is quite a practical vehicle if you are using it occasionally or for long journeys as it can seat 8 comfortably yet carry plenty of luggage(you could fit around 4-5 large travelling bag placed horizontally), it has got atleast double the amount of luggage space compared to a Noah/Esquire. However it is bit of waste of money if you are using it on daily basis as fuel bills are gone be crazy and parking these are not that easy within city limits. In addition, maneuvering these around narrow roads requires some skills especially roads with tight bends. Second hand value and parts Selling a KDH isn't difficult at all, if you maintain them right there will always be people willing it to buy it from you. There are plenty of body parts available but 1KD engine parts are bit difficult to find and even if you do find, it will be expensive Some used parts prices are: Pair of tail lights: 15k for older design and 30k for new design Pair of headlight: more than 100k without the HID unit Rear door: around 40k Fog lights: around 20k What I have done with my Hiace The Modellista body kit came with the van from Japan itself and I added the Modellista grill later on Original Toyota spoiler which came painted pearl white I tinted the fog lamps yellow with Nightbreaker bulbs in them I have also replaced the rear seats which are rotatable and come with a table as well I have done some electronic mods as well, Installed a transcend DrivePro 200 Carrozzeria tweeters with crossover and JBL component speakers with crossover(thanks to @TheFlyingFox) https://streamable.com/ujkce I was planning on installing FIAMM horns, but the JDM side of my brain took over and I went with Mitsuba Alpha https://streamable.com/nbipn Note: click on the links to access the videos My dad had the body kit removed for a short period of time and during that time I drove it through some muddy terrain. It did well.
  3. 11 points
    The first thing that struck me when i sat down to drive this for the first time was the really low seating position - it did not take a lot of getting used to though. The height is of course adjustable and provides a much comfier driving position. The passengers seat on the other hand though cannot be height adjusted. The rear seats too don't have the fabled "magic seats" functionality where you can fold up the seats to increase space in the rear - but you can fold the seats down to create a humongous amount of boot space - I do not quite remember the exact capacity but it's quite a lot. Due to the shape of the roof , while the rear seats are quite comfortable and have a decent amount of space for your legs you might feel a bit of head room is missing. But it won't really translate into a problem - unless you are from Marhsall Eriksen's family . The SR grade (and the SE) for that matter comes with fabric seats - and the interior is black by default (for all grades) . So no "Baij Interiyal" advertisements on the classifieds for this model then. The materials for the seats are quite "scruffy" and the interior is a dust magnet. The material used on the seats particularly are prone to attract a lot of dust and small particles of whatnot. There are speakers on all four doors - something I noticed in other contemporary Hondas as well - the doors also have the same dust-attractive upholstery. I told you there's only a repair kit - but the good news is there is a bit of space in the rear that can double up as storage space or a spare wheel well - so if you're paranoid about having only a repair kit, you can easily carry around a spare The cockpit is contemporary Honda fare. The steering wheel itself is quite plush and has a nice feel to it - though the steering itself is light which I will talk about when i have an entry regarding handling. The usual controls are all there including the cruise control buttons and beneath the wheel you can find the paddle shifters (again paddle shifters + CVT is something i would talk about later) The control for the lane keep assistant is also in the steering wheel. Mind you the Wiper control stalk is on the right and the headlight control stalk is on the left - takes a bit of getting used to if you've previously driven JDM's only. The "Auto" mode in the Wiper means that it will enable the rain sensing wipers and depending on the amount of rain you get the speed will adjust as well. Nice touch but i personally feel it's a bit too dramatic. If i remember correctly the SE grade does not have rain sensing wipers. This being the SR grade you do not get a push start you need a key - the Push start button is there only on the EX trim. With the honda sensing package you get some features like proximity alerts, automatic breaking and lane departure warning. These can be turned on and off and the switches are located near the ignition on the right hand side along with the headlamp leveling switch. The shifter console includes the parking brake (yes there's no separate lever for that), the brake hold button (so your foot can be taken off the brake in for example color lights) there is also a button to toggle the eco-mode as well as to turn on and off auto-braking. Between these two buttons you would find the adaptive damper button on an EX-trim car. There cubby hole is quite small and disappointing given the fact that this is not an alto- and there are no individual cup holders etc - there is a circular holder that can easily accommodate a bottle in the storage area below the slide-able arm rest. This storage area also has a usb port that can be used with the infotainment system. However it has to be said both the usb outlets in front are not in the most accessible places. The other usb slot is practically invisible and hidden by the armrest console along with the HDMI port and Next to that is the 12V circular power outlet. Mind you there is another 12 V power outlet in the boot as well - handy when it comes to plug in your car vacuum. There is also dual zone climate control - other than the dedicated climate control panel fan speed etc can be set via the touch screen.
  4. 11 points
    Hi Guys, Having being an avid reader of the AL forum for years, I thought I'd create an account and contribute as I got a 2018 Civic SR for the wifey a couple of weeks back. (Edit: Looks like I had another account already. May bad. let me kill the new one). Since her N16 was aging (gracefully), we needed an upgrade. The SR had quite alot of features and the interior was quite impressive. With an acceptable amount of crumple zones and weight, it was the right container for the kids to go to school/tuition etc. I got it down through a friend who was kind enough to give the UK registration papers. It clearly states the First Registration date. Even though I trusted the guys, this was like the cherry on top. The Car was shipped in a container arrived in SL in 3 weeks. Put the bad boy on a flat bed and brought it home on the 3rd day after landing in Colombo. First impression of the car all positive. It looks impressive (however I still am not big fan of the back). There's interior is roomy enough for a family of 4. Has enough leg room at the back for an average Sri Lankan. However since the seats are quite low, people with long legs might find it uncomfortable on long journeys. The 3 cylinder engine does sound different.. being very blunt, if a low capacity diesel engine had sex with a land master engine, you would get something that sounds like the civic's engine. But this little turbo charged puppy tend to grow on you so at least for me it's not a deal breaker. From the performance perspective, I'm still breaking in the engine so trying to stay under 100 and 4000 rpm, but you do feel the turbo lag but once it kicks in, you can clearly feel the difference. Handling wise, I'm impressed by how road hugging the car is, quick lane changes are quite enjoyable but I'm sure the 235/45R17s are going to make me pay through the nose come new tire time. Fuel consumption wise, it started at 3km/L the moment after the first tankful and after about 100kms, it's at 6+km/L and still improving. Friends, since this is my first post, if I've violated any rules here, please let me know. More than happy to adjust accordingly.
  5. 11 points
    Title should read "need to look rich, but too broke to pump fuel"
  6. 10 points
    i will summarise what the Teg has been through from 2014 to 2018, in the next few blog posts. ENGINE The car went through 3 additional rebuilds since the first before things start working aright. indika was not the man to have done this with, as he had no experience with B series hondas, and my vision was lost on him. i was severely restricted by the budget of my dreams so i couldn't afford any better. having said that, i have spent 3 times more doing cheap repairs 4 times over than i have spent doing it right, once, with sabry at PAS. the reason my Brian Crower cams were not producing power was that i had not raised the compression adequately in my cylinders. as i was unaware of this, i was running stock compression, which was 10.8:1, which is the lowest compression honda designed for the B series: the GS-R auto. the BC website quite bluntly states that one has to have at least a CR of 12:1 for their cams to work. in this light i was experiencing something like "anti-VTEC" where the normal lobes created oodles of power and when the wild lobes are engaged the car bogs down due to compression and fuelling inadequacies. on this discovery, and being at a bad place personally at the time, i gave up on the BC cams, thinking i have reached the end of my limits with the Teg and i will not be able to complete this. for the first time in my life, i compensated. i backed out. i sold the cams to Rumesh Rajakulendran, who was building his BabyMilo EK9 racecar, and reverted to my auto GSR cams. it was a very low point to have seen those cams go. worse yet, Ruma was thrashing every event he entered and winning by a country mile. he never forgot to acknowledge me and the cams. to add to this, a few months beyond this incident, sabry and i were trying to tune it, and the engine broke. the bearings had given way. and so began... 1. the second rebuild i have her this time to a local garage, Shafiq's, in attidiya. he had a lot of experience i was told with B series hondas, and he seemed to know what he was doing. shafiq then pulled everything apart to find out that one of my chambers is not in line with the others. this required an overbore to remove the discrepancy, and bigger pistons. at this juncture Ashan Silva was kind enough to gift me a set of P72 +25bore Civic Type R pistons, which i used in the rebuild. the bearing failure had also cut the crank, so i had to machine the crank as well. sadly this rebuild lasted the 2000km break in time, and the bearings gave way again while i was on the highway to galle, and it was back to shafiq's for... 2. the third rebuild. the bore was ok now, but the crank had got cut again, and i was given the choice of machining it yet again, and then limping around, as it would not last many trips to 9000+ rpm, or buy a new crank. a crank from honda was around 80,000, while an entire B20B non VTEC CRV engine in toto was 55,000. the choice was obvious. so we harvested the crank from that engine and did the third rebuild. at this point i did some research and came to the conclusion that it was not a good idea to mix and match parts, such as take a b20 crank, pair it with b18 pistons and con rods, and then use a b18 head, as the measurements are all different. the garage thought naught of this and then went ahead. and again, i did the 2000km break in, and was on the dyno tuning it with sabry. the second power run produced 189whp and 280Nm of torque. and then the bearings broke. the engine seized. and this it was time again for *-drum roll please-* 3. THE FOURTH REBUILD!! i was out of money, out of patience, at my wits end. my dream had fallen apart. i cannot adequately communicate to you the dejection i felt when this broke for the third time. my heart just froze over and i was beyond emotion. this was it. Project R had come to its end. with a son on the way and a house planned to be built, i was drained. this was my strength, my love and my life and it has just broken down for what i thought was the last time. i needed space. time. to think this through. one thing was for sure, i was done giving the car to half baked garages. this needed a pro. i wanted this fixed. so i sent her to Platinum as i wanted Sabry to repair it. someday. he removed the engine and i brought the body home. where it went up on jack stands and stayed that way until i could either afford a rebuild, or i made up my mind to sell her for parts and keep the Book. she stayed this way for 8 months. during which time i removed the tyres, and stored them in my room, and every sunday i would head out, and wash her, clean the interior and apply siddhalepa on the rexin surfaces to keep away fungus. this was my ritual once a week for 8 months. until such time i could find the means to afford a rebuild, and sabry could bring the parts down. the day finally did arrive, and boy did sabry pull out a corker. he had plans. big plans. he wanted to do right by me what numerous other people couldn't, and he made this his pet project. we decided to use the block from the b20 engine i had, as my b18 block was fried. and anyhow a b20 would have better lower end torque and thus be an easier daily driver. also my head was perfect. there was no signs of valve or spring wear and it was functioning normally. i had during this time installed a set of ITR camshafts also, and we thought we'd leave that just as it is. so the B20 block was harvested and bored to 2100cc. everything else was brand new. we ordered... 1. An Eagle crankshafft. aluminium. rated for 1500whp, 2. Wiseco pistons and connecting rods. custom made for my b20 block/b18autoGSR head, to produce a CR of 13.0:1. 3. a block guard was installed as the chambers of the b20 are larger, and thus weaker than the b18. the b20 had a redline of 7200rpm. we were pushing the 10,000 limiter again. so a block guard is necessary to prevent the chambers from warping. 4. ACL bearings 5. 510cc EVO 4 injectors, with impedance reset to match the requirement 6. AEM 320LPH high flow fuel pump, with a fuel pressure regulator. sabry took about three weeks for the work, and she was out again in all her glory. she was built with massive tolerances, where, would i ever need to scratch that itch, a set of aftermarket cams or even boost upto 0.8 bar would be easily handled. she was built to last. i do have to appreciate the effort Sabry put into this, as at one point he had made a mistake on the height of the connecting rods, and he sent them back to wiseco to get down the right ones wiseco refused to refund as the mistake was not theirs. sabry bought a new set for the right measurement out of his own pocket. i've switched over to LiquiMOLY MOS2 10w-40 oil, and it has been smooth sailing so far. it is only now, that Project R has truly come alive.
  7. 9 points
    The idea behind this document is to create a guide to buying a used car in Sri Lanka. This is just my preliminary draft, and if it's useful I hope the experts here will add/edit it, and create a final detailed guide, which maybe could be posted somewhere in autolanka (if they think its useful) Buying a used vehicle in Sri Lanka (This applies to purchase of a used car regardless of the price/age, and applies to all registered and 'reconditioned' vehicles.) 1. tests you can perform: ================ Engine ==== Before starting: - check the engine oil. Is it at the correct level? Yes: OK/Owner topped up No: Owner does not top up, engine burning oil, etc Color of oil - Light brown/colorless - engine is running reasonably good/recent service - black - engine running bad/never serviced Note: diesels tend to have dark/black engine oil After starting Did it start easily? Yes: OK No: problems in engine/battery/starter motor/tune/etc. does the exhaust show visible smoke (white, black, bluish or grey smoke)? this coud indicate engine problems such as oil burning, worn engine etc. -- note: diesels do occationally smoke a bit, especially under acceleration does it maintain operating temperature? - listen to the engine in idle - do you hear clattering, rattling, or any odd sounds? they could indicate various problems ranging from bent valves to broken mounts? note: diesels are somewhat louder than normal gasoline engines Test drive =========== Lets say you decide to go for a test drive.. .. Step out of the vehicle, and ask the owner to get it out of his driveway/car sale etc. As he does this observe the vehicle, and see if it smokes or struggles during the procedure. Look at the place where the vehicle was parked. If there is visible engine oil/coolant, etc this could indicate problems in the vehicle. (water may be visible from the car's A/C, this is normal). Ask the owner to drive you: 1. Along a rough road (so you can test the suspension) 2. On a good road, ask the owner to drive up to at least 56km/h (or whatever local speed limit) so you can see how the vehicle performs at high speed. Turn OFF the radio and A/C and listen to the car for rattles/hums Tip: a hum from front/rear may indicate need to replace wheel bearings (or what our people refer to as razors) - Stop the car and ask the owner to back up a small hill, and observe the car exhaust for smoke, this is a good test of the clutch/etc. Actual test drive: - First make sure the vehicle has insurance and road licence which are valid. Ask to see them. Then test drive the vehicle very carefully. Make sure you have a good flat road and there is very little traffic. Remember its an unfamiliar vehicle and proceed with caution. First, test the clutch and brakes. The clutch should engage neatly before releasing the pedal fully. If it engages very late, it could mean a blown clutch plate. If there are clutch/brake problems, don't drive any further, and ask the owner to resume driving. And ask yourself whether you are sure you want to buy this car, from someone who couldnt even do basic maintenance. Reviewing the owner How the owner behaves during the test drive can give you a clue of how s/he uses the vehicle in real life. For example: - Does he roll down the window and drive (even though there is an A/C) - this may indicate that the A/C rarely worked. - Does he drive like a rally driver (in which case you can buy the car if you are willing to buy an extra engine, transmission and suspension) How has s/he spent on the car? If he has spent a lot on cosmetics while ignoring real existing mechanical problems, then you should probably consider another car. Is s/he straightforward and honest? Does what the owner says match up to what you see? For example, if the owner said the car had 2 owners in total and the log book copy shows 4 owners, then they could be lying about other things, and you should be cautious. Sometimes owners make mistakes, or simply don't know an answer, but overall if the owner appears to be honest and straightforward, that is a positive sign. [Ask Questions As you review the car, ask questions from the owner. If you see anything odd, ask about it. If the owner is honest and straightforward, its a positive sign. Try to gauge how much of what the owner is telling is the truth. A good way to do this is to pretend you don't know something and ask a question. After the test drive ============ After you return to the owners house/car sale, ask the owner to pop the hood and inspect the engine. - check temperature management. The gauge inside the car should be half or less. Aside from the gage, the engine should be reasonably managing temperature and the fans should be working properly. - Carefully tap the radiator cap with the tip of your finger. If it burns your finger off, the temperature management isnt good. Similarly the engine bay should not be boiling hot (unless it's a Nissan ) Physical inspection of vehicle ===================== 1. Visual inspection: simply look at the car - see if the lines are straight. Look at the paint. Uneven areas could indicate repainting. - look at the wheel arches. Look at the brakes. Look under the car (front/rear) If possible, take the car to a service station and inspect the underneath. If this is not possible, try to look under the car and see what is visible at least - (carry a flashlight with you when you go to see the car). - look for rust, damage, etc. - look at the engine compartment. Are there odd wires and do things look as if they have been messed with? Sometimes legitimate mods (e.g. alarm systems, aftermarket headlamps) require new wiring but if you see a mess inside, it probably means the wiring has been messed up by local mechanics in which case you should think carefully whether you really want this car. - (If the vehicle is cold) carefully open the radiator cap - check if it contains coolant, and if there is any signs of oil (could indicate a head leak) Look at the engine. If it has a slight layer of dust its OK. If it is shiny and has a layer of oil that means it has been washed at a service station. I prefer a car which has a normal slightly dusty engine vs one that has been washed and scrubbed to 'look' new. - look for leaks in radiator pipes. (with the engine off) remove the engine oil cover - if you can see nice clean silver metal with perhaps yellow brown color (engine oil) this is a positive sign. (note: diesels do tend to have dark/black engine interior, this refers to gasoline vehicles only). - Look at the fluid levels of the various fluids (power steering, brake fluid, auto transmission if auto) - if they are not up to level it could indicate leaks or careless owner. - if the vehicle is hot you may be able to open the radiator overflow tank (be careful) and check if he uses coolant. Not using coolant indicates: 1. Owner is an idiot 2. Radiator has leak and owner is topping it up with ordinary water. Either case, don't buy the car. 2. Tap test gently tap the body of the car, with a fingernail (dont rap it loudly) as you walk around. Check the hood, front left and right side and back carefully, also doors (as these are the main accident prone areas). Other general ideas: - Ask the owner what maintenance was performed. If he tells you a list of things replaced/repaired, this is usually a good sign and means the owner took some effort to look after car. - check the mileage? Mileage can be modified - but if it corresponds with the appearance of the vehicle then it could be accurate. - ask for receipts particularly for the timing belt/clutch etc HAS THE VEHICLE BEEN SERVICED/WASHED? If the owner was so cheap that he couldn't service the vehicle before he sold it, then do you really want to buy a car from him/her? *Exception*: Sometimes the owner may be actively using the car in which case it may be a bit dusty but all the same he/she should have washed/serviced/detailed the car within a few days of deciding to sell it. Now Consider the actual condition of the vehicle and make a list of all problems you encountered: Scenario 1: vehicle has major problems which can be fixed ===================================== for example: - Clutch plate gone. - brakes not too good. -minor suspension probs (e.g. weak shocks). - minor engine probs (e.g. poor tune up). Indicates that the seller was a cheap idiot (or typical local) Verdict: Buy with caution, knowing there could be other existing problems, and repair BEFORE YOU DRIVE said vehicle. Scenario 2: Vehicle has minor problems which can be fixed later ========================================= - A/C not running cold enough. - Minor dings, dents, scratches. - Minor cosmetic issues. Verdict: Buy the car, but set aside money to fix those problems later on. Scenario 3: Vehicle has major problems which can't be fixed easily =========================================== - Chassis problems (cracks/bent chassis) - major engine problems (e.g. grey/white/black smoke, burning oil, head gasket leaks) - major suspension/mechanical problems - gearbox problems which would necessitate replacing gear box... so on. Verdict: don't buy the car, unless you own a garage, have a million to spare, or are plain crazy. Other costs Aside from the above, there are a number of things you usually have to do, when purchasing ANY used car. These usually include: - Insurance & road licence. - 4 tires. - full service/oil change/air filter etc. - brake pads/etc - New battery (if existing battery not too good). - Timing belt (if close to 100k km's or multiples of that). Many people will say they replaced the belt, they could be lying. It's easier to spend 10k and replace it than to undergo a broken belt and engine rebuild. If they have replaced the belt, you can get a good garage to visually inspect it. signs of a good vehicle: - Vehicle is clean. (As in, the owner has washed, cleaned, and serviced it.) - is in good mechanical condition (good engine, transmission, suspension, brakes, body) - owner has focused on maintaining the mechanical condition of the vehicle - Vehicle has been maintained properly and scheduled maintenance has been done, e.g. brakes, clutch, timing, etc have been replaced at the proper intervals as necessary. - owner cares about vehicle, services regularly, engine oil is not dirty - owner is upfront and honest about any flaws. - owner uses a good garage for maintenance, and used original/quality components Suggestion 1: To all the experts here, can you please add your comments/suggestions tips on buying a used car. Suggestion 2: Would it be possible for Autolanka readers/Admins to set up a car pricing guide? This could be something updated regularly to show average true market values (like edmunds.com) and be useful to people looking to purchase a car. If any Autolanka readers have suggestions on what they check when buying a used car, please add them here. Update: Top gear have some excellent tips here:
  8. 9 points
    My old vanettes speedo glass has been faded , bubbled and cracked since I bought the vehicle and it kept getting worse and i've tried to find a suitable replacement for a while with no luck. Recently the glass cracked apart in two in middle and it looked terrible. Vanette C22 dashboards rare to find and one bugger asked 45K for a heavily warn out one. I could not spend that much for the glass and two air vents ( except those , the existing dashboard is fine) . So I decided to make a glass myself and it came out very nice. 25010M is the part I made. total cost : Rs 400/= ,only thing I bought was a piece of transparent plastic board from a number plate making place. here are few pics I took while doing it, only took about and hour for that whole job. I feel like an ass when I think about the time I wasted stopping at every breaker joint I see where ever I went. Sorry for the lack of extra details , but this is too easy for anyone to get wrong. If anyone needs more details please PM . 1. Removed front part of the cluster, and cracked glass is fixed with a piece of duct tape to take measurements for the new one. 2. Lay the glass on the plastic board and draw the outline with a pen 3. Cut the straight lines with a help of a steel ruler and a paper cutter. We dont need those small extrusions around the glass since we are going to duct tape it to the frame and hot glue it. Just cut straight. Cutting the plastic board is bit difficult using the paper cutter, put cuts on both sides before applying gentle pressure to break the glass - just like glass cutting, but put marks on both sides. 4. smooth out the edges with a angle grinder. 5. it has a small curve along two sides, use the angle grinder to grindout the plastic to get the previously marked shape 6. The original glass has a convex shape , no need to worry , we can use the frame around the dashboard to push the glass to the speedo cluster to get that shape, ( I tried to use the hot air gun to bend the plastic glass after warming it up and messed it up once - dont do it) 7. Drill out a small hole for the trip meter reset . 8. keep the glass on the meter frame and duct tape it. dont try to bend and close the gaps on the right and left sides. duct tape the top and bottom only. Use hot glue on places where the clip were before. Use it generously . 9. Fix it to the dashboard , tight in the screws well - and thats it! Looks just like new.
  9. 9 points
    Oh man.... you miss the point again... There are two factors you need to consider when you are maintaining a car. 1. price of spares 2. frequency of breakdown. You are only looking at the first factor here, without thinking of the second one. If you buy an old BMW that has been very well maintained, you will end up spending less for overall maintenance of the car compared to buying a maruti, which is poorly maintained. Think of it this way. You have two girls as options. One girl wears cheap clothes but is a party animal. wants to go clubbing every night. The second one wears only branded clothes but goes out once in a while to enjoy. Your assumption is that the first one is 'low maintenance' cos her clothes are cheap...
  10. 8 points
    Finally she’s here😁Thanking all the members who helped me in various ways💪
  11. 8 points
    The car as it may seem right now.... Broken and Shiz.. About to get a new life... Tinkering Done!
  12. 8 points
    Hi Guys, Posting a DYI again after quite some time. After I got new wheels for my car, the stock rims have been lying around and I thought of repairing them. Two of the wheels had nasty kerb damage thanks to the previous owner who was careless when parallel parking (wheels with the most damage were the ones on the left). When I was looking for a set of used BBS rims for my car, 90% of the rims I found had kerb damage. So the problem is pretty common and getting these professionally repaired and resprayed can cost a lot. If you are keen on doing this on your own, you might find this post useful. Things you need: Alloy wheel repair putty (eBay Link? This is a specially formulated putty to work with alloy wheels and I found it to be very effective. Sandpaper (200, 400, 800 wet, 1200 wet) Masking tape, scissors, old newspapers to mask Clean rags Water for wet sanding Wax and grease remover/Degreaser Old toothbrush Rubber gloves For illustration purposes, I have selected one area of a rim where you can see kerb damage. This is what I’ll be working with. Step 1: Prepare the surface for repair Using degreaser, toothbrush and a rag, scrub and clean the area and get the grime out of the damaged area. As you can see from the above photo, there’s a lot of grime in there. Next, use the coarse dry sandpaper to remove any material that maybe protruding out of the surface of the wheel. We need a smooth surface and the alloy wheel putty needs to fill in the scratches. The following photo is after sanding and washing the area. Step 2: Apply the repair Putty The putty is a stick and has the texture of crafting clay. It’s a two-part putty and you need to knead it between your fingers for the two parts to mix up (wear gloves for protection). Then roll it on a flat surface to form a very thin bead. Place the bead on the damaged area and press firmly. As the two parts start to react, you can feel the putty heat up. It hardens up rock solid within about 15 minutes. You can start sanding in about an hour. Remember not to apply excessive amounts of putty, because a lot of effort will be needed to sand it down if you do. The stuff is a bit harder to sand than regular body filler. This was the first spot I applied the putty to, I applied a little too much and had to spend a lot of time sanding it down. So once again, VERY little. This photo is probably a bad example of how to apply it, but you get what I mean. Step 3: Sanding Start with 200 grit dry sandpaper and work your way to a smooth surface. Use masking tape to prevent damage to the tyre. If you plan to do only a touch-up and not paint the entire wheel, you might need to mask the wheel as well, to avoid scratching it up. Run your bare fingers on the edge of the rim from time to time and feel the smoothness, you should be able to tell if there are imperfections. When the surface is smooth, move to wet sanding (first 800 grit and then 1200 grit to remove the fine scratches). If you plan to paint the entire wheel, water sand the wheel with these two papers so that the surface has a “blunt” texture. The new paint will stick better this way. After the sanding is done, the surface will look nice and smooth, no more kerb damage! It’s important to sand the putty down so that there is no excessive putty between the tyre and the wheel, you can insert the sandpaper into the gap and sand away, the original curve of the wheel needs to be maintained. As you can see from the above photos, I have sanded the putty all the way down to the rim so that the only bit remaining is the putty that fills the scratches. This is exactly what we need. If you feel like you need one more pass, go ahead and repeat step 2 and 3 again. This is it for the repair. All that is left now is to paint the area. I will cover that in a separate post. Let me know what you guys think and if you know of other ways of DIY methods to repair wheels. Thanks for reading! Cheers!
  13. 8 points
    Mr. Potato Garden is a first class id*ot. He's not any different from all the assorted morons that appear in TV, claiming themselves to be experts in one thing or the other. Sumanadasa, Galthenne Gamini, doctors who promote cosmetics... they are all the same. Just FYI, few years ago when I was out of country for a while, my Wife's car developed a problem, which I recognized to be worn CV joints. Since potato garden has his garage about 100m from where I live and the place appeared to be safe for a lady to visit, I asked her to take the car there. Potato garden claimed he replaced both CV joints and gave a bill of about 20k. The problem reappeared about 3 months later when I was back in SL. I took the car to my trusted mechanic (since I jolly well know there are no warranties for any mechanical repair work in this country). Took out the CV joints myself and realized that only one CV joint had been replaced - that too with a lathed one and the boots were not greased. Not a drop of grease was seen. So much for Potato Garden's work!
  14. 7 points
    one of the greatest joys of having a car that actually runs and doesn't sit in the garage more often than it does at home, is that i can actually leather it now and then. this is one thing i am eternally grateful to PAS and Sabry for: for coming through with what they promised and building a car to last. it was on his insistence that i entered the drags. i stood no chance fromm the get go. i was in the 1800cc-2500cc NA class, and i was up against 5 other competitors who brought drag prepped monsters carried there on trailers. while i drove my daily whip to the track, raced, and drove back. but with a qualifying time in the 15s range, with the winner running 12s, i'm quite pleased! i was loaned a pair of semi slicks for the race. this is why i love this community. the love, people. the love! our resident rice police @VVTi and @Bugatti both took part in the one make BMW event, and i was sharing their tent space, feeling much like the Geisha to a platoon of SS soldiers... ^^this, by far, is my favourite shot. this is going on a wall somewhere. Built. Driven. Inspired. with Sacha Peiris in his Babyzilla here's the two time trials: and here's the qualifier. i was booted out after this. but hey, i'll be back! this was easily the most fun day of my entire life. to actually have a car that could run a race, and then go home in, to me, was the real victory. and while i sat there, on the start line, with the throttle blipping on launch control, i realized i didn't even have to run the race. i'd already won. the result was immaterial! <-- this was how the other 5 cars went home. mine is still proudly daily driven. all i did was remove the stickers.
  15. 7 points
    Finally. At long last, the ITR sedan conversion is done!! Here she is in all her glory. More glam pics in the upcoming months! Few niggles I’m trying to fix. The front end didn’t come with fender liners/mudguards. Sourced those from uk. Also I was using a lengthened shifter linkage from an ek3 with a d series box. Apparently that’s why shifting into reverse and 2nd are difficult. Waiting on a proper ITR shifter linkage from the UK as well. Along with the stock dual bend shifter.
  16. 7 points
    I joined this forum in 2012 when I only had a rusty mountain bike with no brakes! Learned lots and finally obtained my dream. Didn't think of resale,fuel or what not. Just followed my heart! But sad to see the newer generation of car buyers, makes me weep hard. Does anybody even care about driving the damn thing anymore? instead of resale and fuel! This is not showing off. Just an Appreciation to AL and the community! PS. Its a 2 Liter Turbo with 200 horses and still does over 13kmpl city, so go f*** off with ur premios and vezis!
  17. 7 points
    Skyline and Fuel Economy in one sentence? Ye gods... I wanna kill myself.
  18. 7 points
  19. 7 points
    It's been a great year for all of us, especially with the new updates and resources added to AutoLanka Forum. We are committed to keep moving forward to ensure that we provide a platform to discuss and find all things related to motoring free of charge. On behalf of Team Autolanka I would like to thank our senior members, moderators and new members for their utmost contribution and support throughout the year. I would like to make this an opportunity to appreciate the hard work done by following senior members @iRage @Davy @Crosswind @Rumesh88 who have gone extra steps during the time of need by helping out our fellow members and earned top 4 ranks in Autolanka Leaderboard for the year 2017! Here's to 2018 and all the adventures it brings. Wish All Auto Lankans A Very Happy New Year 2018!! Enjoy & Drive Safe!!
  20. 7 points
    I'm sorry I don't represent the government, so I have no idea.
  21. 7 points
    Hiding the issue and selling the car is not ethical. That will handover the issue to another person rather solving it. Sad about your situation @Aslam86. Also shame about you @florider
  22. 7 points
    Ok, Well noted Madz. Simply, Original Post Whoring thread - Bloemendal Post Whoring thread 2 - Meethotamulla Post Whoring thread 3 - Karadiyana
  23. 7 points
    There was a discussion on FB about this with Harsha de Silva. Apparently the MoU was initially signed between VW, Senok and GoSL (thru BOI) as a three-way agreement. Subsequently, the scandal happened at VW and VW decided to backbench the idea of starting an operation in SL. Senok decided to go ahead with the project anyway and is also looking at assembling other European brands in the same plant. I guess it will be virtually the same as what Micro does, but with brands with a little more repute than Geely, chingchong, chongching etc. Inbred retards in this country need to see everything through a political angle. That's the biggest problem of this country and the reason why we can't develop. If party X does something, party X fans vehemently support it and party Y fans vehemently oppose it. Few years later when party Y does the same thing, party Y fans vehemently support it and party X fans find a million reasons to oppose it. If you remember the past, Micro started with much much bigger fanfare than this one. Even if someone starts a new Kottu Roti kade, you should be happy because at least one person will get a job.
  24. 6 points
    Guess who’s back, bit#hes! Time to end this. Project R is very nearly finished. It’s been four years since I posted anything and so much has happened since then. Not gonna bore you with details but will try to 1. Update the old photo links 2. Summarise what has happened since then. 3. Cover future plans. Heres a teaser for now
  25. 6 points
    Hi, Yes monocular vision driving is allowed in sri lanka under some conditions.(I'm a guy with monocular vision and got the licence [through the legal process]). They allow to drive a car(should be registered under your name) with additional side mirrors.Licence should be renew in two years period and they are printing the vehicle no on the backside of the driver's licence.Hope this helps cheers!!!
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